Old Norse


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Old Norse

n.
1. The North Germanic languages until the mid-1300s.
2.
a. Old Icelandic.
b. Old Norwegian.

Old Norse

n
(Languages) the language or group of dialects of medieval Scandinavia and Iceland from about 700 to about 1350, forming the North Germanic branch of the Indo-European family of languages. Abbreviation: ON See also Proto-Norse, Old Icelandic

Old′ Norse′


n.
the North Germanic language of medieval Scandinavia. Abbr.: ON
[1835–45]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Old Norse - the extinct Germanic language of medieval Scandinavia and Iceland from about to 700 to 1350
Germanic, Germanic language - a branch of the Indo-European family of languages; members that are spoken currently fall into two major groups: Scandinavian and West Germanic
Old Icelandic - the extinct dialect of Old Norse that was spoken in Iceland up until about 1600
Translations
vieux norrois
nórdico antigo
References in classic literature ?
In old Norse times, the thrones of the sea-loving Danish kings were fabricated, saith tradition, of the tusks of the narwhale.
Take up the literature of 1835, and you will find the poets and novelists asking for the same impossible gift as did the German Minnesingers long before them and the old Norse Saga writers long before that.
Using insights from Old Norse and other Germanic languages and from theoretical linguistics, I argue that the meanings of the word unfaege and its cognates as well as the word's prenominal position suggest a relationship between being brave and being an unfaegene eorl.
Critique: In "The Last Conference: A Pragmatist Saga", author Arild Pedersen clearly draws upon his many years of experience and expertise as a professor of philosophy at the University of Oslo (Norway) and his familiarity with old Norse saga traditions to craft a complex and engaging novel set in contemporary times.
The authors note precursors in Gothic, Old Norse, Old English, Shakespeare, Sir Walter Scott, and E.
This is a formal and functional study of the three distinct meters of Old Norse eddic poetry.
However, the fact is that the name Durham (with a silent 'H') is a compound of the Old English word "dun", meaning hill and the Old Norse "holme", meaning island because it is built on seven hills and on a peninsula.
Included in its entirety is a first translation into English of Richard's "Four Degrees of Violent Love," a spiritual treatise highly influential during the Middle Ages; it was translated into several vernacular languages, including Old Norse.
Origin of the term are uclear, but some sources (the Oxford English Dictionary, Webster's) derived It from Old Norse Hrufa ("crust on a wound, scab").
Three of them were written in Old Norse and one in Latin.
The linguistic counterpart of the above oddity is a pair of adjectives with virtually identical meanings and with the same violent history underlying their absorption into the English language, one from the Malay, the other from Old Norse.
Starboard comes from the old English word steobord (itself from the old Norse word styri, meaning rudder), the side on which boats were steered by an oarsman at the stern and, since the majority of men were righthanded, the steering oar was situated on the right side of the vessel.