Old Persian


Also found in: Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to Old Persian: Avestan

Old Persian

n.
An Old Iranian language attested in cuneiform inscriptions dating from the sixth to the fifth century bc.

Old Persian

n
(Languages) an ancient language belonging to the West Iranian branch of the Indo-European family, recorded in cuneiform inscriptions of the 6th to the 4th centuries bc. See also Middle Persian

Old′ Per′sian


n.
an ancient Iranian language attested in the cuneiform inscriptions of the Achaemenid empire. Abbr.: OPers
References in classic literature ?
She danced, she turned, she whirled rapidly about on an old Persian rug, spread negligently under her feet; and each time that her radiant face passed before you, as she whirled, her great black eyes darted a flash of lightning at you.
You may remember the old Persian saying, 'There is danger for him who taketh the tiger cub, and danger also for whoso snatches a delusion from a woman.
1840; "Le Culte du Feu," a folio volume of ponderous research into the religion and ritual of the old Persian Ghebers, published in 1841; "La Soiree du Chateau en Espagne," 1 tom.
On display will also be exhibits related to the sciences of the Quran, a 1,000-year-old rare Quran copy and old Persian and Turkish manuscripts.
Everything in the Persian Room is created by artists -- even the curtains are made by a calligrapher featuring an old Persian poem.
The Achaemenid Old Persian term for Elam was Hujiya, which is present in the modern name.
As Kassinger explains it, the word paradise comes from the Old Persian, apiri-daeza, meaning orchard surrounded by a wall.
Her husband took an old Persian sword from underneath his bed and swiped at the imaginary intruders in the darkness.
Here, boxwood sprigs and berries surround an antique Victorian spelter statue of Sir Walter Raleigh; treasured old Persian blue opaline boxes filled with fresh coral and yellow roses create a personal welcome at each place setting.
It has not yet been conclusively established, but the thinking is that the name is derived from an Old Persian word napta 'damp', 'wet' or 'liquid'.
Switch the time: If Behrani, the warrior, had left Persia in a chariot drawn by his favorite horses and fled the collapsing palace, gathered his family onto the chariot, crossed the border into a new land, found shelter and then found that a beautiful witch was trying to drive them out of their shelter, you'd say, ``That's probably an old Persian fable, isn't it?
For instance, "one hundred" appears as "shimtas" in Lithuanian, "centum" in Latin, and "satem" in Old Persian.