omega-3 fatty acid

(redirected from Omega-3 fatty acids)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.

omega-3 fatty acid

n.
Any of several polyunsaturated fatty acids that are essential for human metabolism, have anticoagulant properties, and are found in leafy green vegetables, vegetable oils, nuts, and fish such as salmon and mackerel. Increasing dietary intake of omega-3 fatty acids can decrease serum concentrations of triglycerides and LDL cholesterol while increasing HDL cholesterol.

[So called because the first double bond in the chain of carbon atoms in such fatty acids is found between the third and fourth atoms when counted from the omega end of the chain.]

omega-3 fatty acid

n
(Cookery) an unsaturated fatty acid that occurs naturally in fish oil and is valuable in reducing blood-cholesterol levels

o•me′ga-3 fat′ty ac′id

(oʊˈmi gəˌθri, oʊˈmeɪ-, oʊˈmɛg ə-)
n.
a fatty acid found esp. in fish oil and valuable in reducing cholesterol levels in the blood.
[1980–85]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.omega-3 fatty acid - a polyunsaturated fatty acid whose carbon chain has its first double valence bond three carbons from the beginning
alpha-linolenic acid - a polyunsaturated fatty acid with 18 carbon atoms; the only omega-3 fatty acid found in vegetable products; it is most abundant in canola oil; a fatty acid essential for nutrition
polyunsaturated fatty acid - an unsaturated fatty acid whose carbon chain has more than one double or triple valence bond per molecule; found chiefly in fish and corn and soybean oil and safflower oil
docosahexaenoic acid - an omega-3 fatty acid with 22 carbon atoms; found in fish (especially tuna and bluefish)
eicosapentaenoic acid - an omega-3 fatty acid with 20 carbon atoms; found in fish (especially tuna and bluefish)
References in periodicals archive ?
Researchers at University of South Florida in Tampa, Florida, have found that children whose mothers consume high doses of Omega-3 fatty acids daily during the third trimester are less likely to develop such breathing problems.
Giving heart attack patients a high daily dose of omega-3 fatty acids from fish oil for six months after a heart attack improved the function of the heart and reduced scarring by 5.
TEHRAN (FNA)- Taking a high dose of omega-3 fatty acids from fish oil daily for six months after a heart attack improved the function of the heart and reduced scarring in the undamaged muscle, according to a new study.
Proponents of decreasing omega-6 fats from the diet say that because both types of polyunsaturated fats are metabolized in similar pathways, omega-6 fatty acids block omega-3 fatty acids from exerting their anti-inflammatory properties.
A meta-analysis was conducted on 7 randomized controlled trials (including a total of 790 patients) that examined the effect of omega-3 fatty acids in the treatment of dry eye syndrome.
The amount of high-quality evidence is insufficient for using omega-3 fatty acids to treat major depressive disorder in adults, researchers said in a Cochrane Review.
Nasrallah is correct that wild salmon is a good choice for pregnant women who want to boost intake of omega-3 fatty acids (Current Psychiatry, Comments & Controversies, December 2014; pg 33 [http://bit.
An article published in the Journal of the American Medical Association Neurology reports that those who consumed high levels of omega-3 fatty acids had a dramatically reduced risk of developing amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, or Lou Gehrig's disease) in a meta-analysis of five large studies.
Many researchers think a higher intake of omega-3 fatty acids (found in meats and dairy products from grass-fed animals, flaxseed, seafood, walnuts and some leafy greens) reduces the risk of heart disease and, potentially, cancer by offsetting the too-high intake of omega-6 fatty acids in the contemporary U.
7%) contained omega-3 fatty acids in EE form, or a combination of EEs and triglycerides (TGs).
According to the study, led by the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health, middle-aged men in Japan had lower incidence of coronary artery calcification, a predictor of heart disease, than middle-aged white men living in the US, likely due to the significantly higher consumption of omega-3 fatty acids found in fish.
Higher levels of omega-3 fatty acids in the blood may reduce the risk for hip fractures in postmenopausal women, suggests a study in the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research.