omega-6 fatty acid

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Related to Omega-6 fatty acids: Omega-3 fatty acids

omega-6 fatty acid

n.
Any of several polyunsaturated fatty acids, including linoleic acid, that are essential for human metabolism and are found in poultry, nuts, beans, and vegetable oils such as canola and soybean oil. Increasing dietary intake of omega-6 fatty acids can decrease LDL cholesterol levels in the bloodstream.

[So called because the first double bond in the chain of carbon atoms in such fatty acids is found between the sixth and seventh atoms when counted from the omega end of the chain.]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.omega-6 fatty acid - a polyunsaturated fatty acid whose carbon chain has its first double valence bond six carbons from the beginning
polyunsaturated fatty acid - an unsaturated fatty acid whose carbon chain has more than one double or triple valence bond per molecule; found chiefly in fish and corn and soybean oil and safflower oil
linolenic acid - a liquid polyunsaturated fatty acid that occurs in some plant oils; an essential fatty acid
References in periodicals archive ?
Researchers from Karolinska Institutet in Solna, Sweden suggested that polyunsaturated fatty acids, omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids are essential to life and the body is unable to produce itself, so they must be sourced from foods such as nuts and certain vegetable oils; and long-chain omega-3 fatty acids are primarily found in oily fish.
One type of fat that still elicits confusion is a class of polyunsaturated fats called omega-6 fatty acids, found in soybean oil, corn oil, nuts and seeds.
A ratio of three omega-6 fatty acids to one omega-3 fatty acid is best, since excessive amounts of omega-6 are unhealthy.
Sixty-seven adults (mean age, 42 years) with chronic headaches (93% of which were migraines) occurring a mean of 23 days per month were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 intensive dietary interventions for 12 weeks: a diet low in omega-6 fatty acids and high in omega-3 fatty acids (eicosapentaenoic acid [EPA] and docosahexaenoic acid [DHA]) or a diet low in omega-6 fatty acids and containing the low amount of EPA and DHA present in a typical US diet.
A study by Duke University researchers published in the Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases found that mice fed omega-3 fatty acid supplements had healthier joints than those fed diets high in saturated fats and omega-6 fatty acids, suggesting that certain dietary fats, and not simply body weight, can lead to osteoarthritis.
Many researchers think a higher intake of omega-3 fatty acids (found in meats and dairy products from grass-fed animals, flaxseed, seafood, walnuts and some leafy greens) reduces the risk of heart disease and, potentially, cancer by offsetting the too-high intake of omega-6 fatty acids in the contemporary U.
The study also showed that, as the ratio of omega-6 fatty acids to omega-3s increases, so does the risk for hip fracture.
OMEGA-6 fatty acids are more prevalent in farmed fish than in wild fish, a State Laboratory study comparing the two types of fish has shown.
Release date- 22102012 - Adding omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids to infant formula improves baby development during the first three months of their lives.
The scientists, whose findings are reported in the journal Neurology, looked at 10 nutrients including saturated fatty acids, omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids, mono-unsaturated fatty acid, vitamins E, C, B12 and D, folate and beta-carotene.
In contrast, polyunsaturated omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids, which have multiple double bonds, are considered essential in the human diet: they cannot be synthesized and must be consumed.
Though both omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids are healthy but according to experts it is important to maintain a balanced ratio of both the nutrients.