Omitter


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O`mit´ter


n.1.One who omits.
References in periodicals archive ?
China has overtaken the US as the largest greenhouse omitter in the world.
Moore sees omissions as nothing more than deceptive labels that attribute eventlike or cause-like characteristics to an individual's failure to act, when in fact the event or cause in question is something else: a force of nature, the normal course of events, or the actions of another that the omitter (had he acted) would have kept from causing harm.
After all, not all crimes of omission require that some harm result from the omission, thus not all crimes of omission require that the omitter make the world a better place.
After all, if omissions cannot be causes, then the "injustices" that might be attributed to not punishing omitters (which he mentions in his exception to his normative claim) must be caused by some other metaphysical entity and cannot be properly attributed to the omission or to the omitter.
One may object that it sounds odd to say that an omission is voluntary when the omitter simply forgets to perform the required action.
7-letter examples include BASSIST, CLEANER, DIRTIED, EVENTER, GITTERN, OMITTED, OMITTER, PERSIST, RASPIER and SUBSIST.
If the willful blindness doctrine is applied to omissions, the omitter has no choice but to investigate her suspicion.
The knowledge required by [section] 262 refers to the omitter herself and requires that we examine her internal world.
Omissions result in criminal liability only when the omitter has a duty to the victim.
What is at issue is not whether every wrongful committer and every wrongful omitter are equivalently culpable.
Perhaps omitters are generally less culpable than committers; perhaps the kinds of things done omissively are generally less grave than things done through commission; perhaps both claims are true.