Omphale


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Omphale

(ˈɒmfəˌliː)
n
(Classical Myth & Legend) Greek myth a queen of Lydia, whom Hercules was required to serve as a slave to atone for the murder of Iphitus
References in classic literature ?
and don't we see every day in the world many an honest Hercules at the apron-strings of Omphale, and great whiskered Samsons prostrate in Delilah's lap?
Like Iseult, this adulteress escaped punishment through guile, and she joins the ranks of Cranach's other humiliators of men, Omphale and Phyllis.
Omphale in The Brazen Age is crushed by rocks, and the Empress in Alphonsus Emperor of Germany dragged by the hair (along with many others).
On Scyros, Thetis attempts to coax her boy into assuming feminine raiment by comparing several mythological characters who experienced gender transformation: Hercules, who dressed as a woman as a servant of Queen Omphale, the androgynous god Bacchus, Jupiter, who disguised himself as Diana when in pursuit of Callisto, and Caeneus / Caenis.
Like Sadler's Wells, Highflyer lost no time establishing his supremacy; he had the St Leger-winning filly Omphale and two top-class colts in Delpini and Rockingham in his first crop, and in their four-year-old season he was champion sire, ending the eight-year reign of his own sire, Herod.
184] The sloe-eyed Omphale holds the hero's club and wears his lion's skin while the befuddled hero does "woman's work" pulling the thread of the distaff.
The central young man holds a woman's spinning tool, a distaff, certainly referring to another story of Hercules, when he was forced to take this humiliating role by Omphale with whom he was besotted.
Alluding to the Nouvelle Omphale, another play promoted to les Grands, namely to the Comedie Italienne, Meister identifies Beaunoir as its author (whose) "many other masterpieces .
Such gender-shifting is apparent, for instance, in the myth of Hercules and the Lydian queen Omphale, where the two mythic figures swap genders: Hercules spins with Omphale's slaves and is represented wearing a woman's clothes (Kampen 1996: 233-46, figures 98, 99).