Ones


Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
(ōns)
adv.1.Once.
References in classic literature ?
Girls," said Meg seriously, looking from the tumbled head beside her to the two little night-capped ones in the room beyond, "Mother wants us to read and love and mind these books, and we must begin at once.
There were three of the Winters boys in that family, John, Hal, and Edward, all broad-shouldered big fellows like old Windpeter himself and all fighters and woman-chasers and generally all-around bad ones.
The next few days were busy ones for Tom, Ned and, in fact, the whole Swift household.
The big yellow and brown ones won't hurt you; they're bull-snakes and help to keep the gophers down.
There are no words to describe her save the old ones that have served so often to picture the bygone heroine of romance and the fair lady of our dreams.
These gentle ones may keep close, but the Mohicans and I will watch upon the rock, where I suppose a major of the Sixtieth would wish to keep us company.
It makes me think of all the yellow things I ever saw--not beautiful ones like buttercups, but old foul, bad yellow things.
A river of them poured in through the gate--and then gradually ebbed away again, until there were only a few late ones running, and the watchman pacing up and down, and the hungry strangers stamping and shivering.
Upon this, one has to remark that men ought either to be well treated or crushed, because they can avenge themselves of lighter injuries, of more serious ones they cannot; therefore the injury that is to be done to a man ought to be of such a kind that one does not stand in fear of revenge.
At the recital we little ones will press closer to one another, yet smile as we do so; when suddenly, everyone becomes silent.
Thus pleasantly conversing on the favorable circumstances of our position as compared with those of past pilgrims and of narrow-minded ones at the present day, we soon found ourselves at the foot of the Hill Difficulty.
These dainty ones are themselves contemptuously called Figs by David and other heroes, and you have a key to the manners and customs of this dandiacal section of the Gardens when I tell you that cricket is called crickets here.