ontological argument


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ontological argument

n
1. (Philosophy) the traditional a priori argument for the existence of God on the grounds that the concept itself necessitates existence. Compare cosmological argument, teleological argument
2. any analogous argument from the nature of some concept to the existence of whatever instantiates it
References in periodicals archive ?
Bonaventure, in turn, draws on the ontological argument to couch his exemplarist metaphysics in Franciscan terms; that is, in terms of the Incarnation.
The ontological argument would be one of the most momentous pages in the history of philosophy.
Their entire project seems to depend in some fairly basic sense on the defensibility of some version of the ontological argument for the existence of God.
Both arguments seek "a cause of the world's being a cosmos" but the ontological argument emphasizes "on order, design, and the adaptation of means to ends.
His ontological argument is as familiar to academics as a footnote.
Anselm's moribund, if not altogether dead-and-buried, ontological argument.
Thus Descartes's ontological argument produces a self-evident and self-verifying subject, the subject that "knows" and identifies itself first and then rests all subsequent knowledge on the basis of that first identification that in turn can only be guaranteed metaphysically.
Chapter 2, "Grounds for Belief and Disbelief in God," reviews very briefly the ontological argument, the argument from causality, Aquinas' proofs, and the moral argument for God.
This is particularly true of "On the Threshold," in which the grounds for Nancy's consideration of the origins of art in cave painting are once more mapped in the form of the ontological argument.
T60; CSM 3:343), the ontological argument might be intended to show that the essence of the cause of all contingent essences is a necessary being.
Most contemporary analytic philosophers know Anselm of Canterbury primarily through the famous ontological argument of his Proslogion.
Among the topics are a second look at the evidential argument from evil, the problem of divine perfection and freedom, modal versions of the ontological argument, and Dewey and Wieman on religion within the bounds of naturalism.