opsonin

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op·so·nin

 (ŏp′sə-nĭn)
n.
A substance, such as an antibody or complement protein, that binds to a bacterium or other pathogen and causes it to become more susceptible to the action of phagocytes.

[Latin opsōnāre, to buy provisions (from Greek opsōnein, from opson, condiment, delicacy; see epi in Indo-European roots) + -in.]

opsonin

(ˈɒpsənɪn)
n
(Biochemistry) a constituent of blood serum that renders invading bacteria more susceptible to ingestion by phagocytes in the serum
[C20: from Greek opsōnion victuals]
opsonic adj

op•so•nin

(ˈɒp sə nɪn)

n.
any of several constituents of blood serum, as an antibody or complement, that make invading microorganisms more susceptible to destruction by phagocytes.
[1900–05; < Latin opsōn(ium) victuals]
op•son•ic (ɒpˈsɒn ɪk) adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.opsonin - an antibody in blood serum that attaches to invading microorganisms and other antigens to make them more susceptible to the action of phagocytes
blood serum, serum - an amber, watery fluid, rich in proteins, that separates out when blood coagulates
antibody - any of a large variety of proteins normally present in the body or produced in response to an antigen which it neutralizes, thus producing an immune response
Translations
opsonina

op·so·nin

n. opsonina, anticuerpo que al combinarse con un antígeno hace que éste sea más suceptible a los fagocitos.
References in periodicals archive ?
Many acute-phase proteins such as CRP and SAA, bind to microbial cell walls and they may act as opsonins and fix complement.
This bacterium inhibits the chemotaxis of neutrophils, suppresses the opsonins (both complement and immunoglobulin) and phagocytes, could rapidly react to abrupt changes in ROS (Lavoie et al.
1983) Binding and phagocytosis of sialidase-treated rat erythrocytes by a mechanism independent of opsonins.
Humoral factors are able to recognize foreign antigens, acting as surface phagocyte receptors and regulating the migration and concentration of hemocyte opsonins (Anderson & Beaven 2001, Yang et al.
This reduction of bacterial load by using autologous plasma along with leucocytes is attributed through supplementation of plasma derived opsonins and particularly components of complement systems in uterine lumen (Asbury, 1984).