oration

(redirected from Orations)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia.

o·ra·tion

 (ô-rā′shən, ō-rā′-)
n.
1. A formal speech, especially one given on a ceremonial occasion.
2. A speech delivered in a high-flown or pompous manner.

[Middle English oracion, prayer, from Late Latin ōrātiō, ōrātiōn-, from Latin, discourse, from ōrātus, past participle of ōrāre, to speak.]

oration

(ɔːˈreɪʃən)
n
1. a formal public declaration or speech
2. any rhetorical, lengthy, or pompous speech
3. (Education) an academic exercise or contest in public speaking
[C14: from Latin ōrātiō speech, harangue, from ōrāre to plead, pray]

o•ra•tion

(ɔˈreɪ ʃən, oʊˈreɪ-)

n.
a formal public speech, esp. for a special occasion.
[1325–75; Middle English oracion < Latin ōrātiō speech, prayer, derivative of ōrāre to plead, derivative of ōr-, s. of ōs mouth]
syn: See speech.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.oration - an instance of oratoryoration - an instance of oratory; "he delivered an oration on the decline of family values"
peroration - (rhetoric) the concluding section of an oration; "he summarized his main points in his peroration"
oratory - addressing an audience formally (usually a long and rhetorical address and often pompous); "he loved the sound of his own oratory"
peroration - a flowery and highly rhetorical oration

oration

noun speech, talk, address, lecture, discourse, harangue, homily, spiel (informal), disquisition, declamation a brief funeral oration

oration

noun
A usually formal oral communication to an audience:
Translations
خِطاب، خُطْبَه
tale
nyilvános beszéd
viîhafnarræîa
iškalbos menaskalbėtojasoracijaoratorinisoratoriškas
runasvinīga runa

oration

[ɔːˈreɪʃən] N (= speech) → discurso m; (= peroration) → arenga f
funeral orationoración f fúnebre

oration

[əˈreɪʃən] noraison f
a brief funeral oration → une brève oraison funèbre

oration

nAnsprache f; funeral orationGrabrede f

oration

[ɔːˈreɪʃn] norazione f
funeral oration → orazione funebre

oration

(əˈreiʃən) noun
a formal, public speech, especially in fine, beautiful language. a funeral oration.
orator (ˈorətə) noun
a person who makes public speeches, especially very eloquent ones.
ˈoratory (ˈorə-) noun
the art of speaking well in public.
oraˈtorical adjective
References in classic literature ?
He certainly did add `spirit' to the meetings, and `a tone' to the paper, for his orations convulsed his hearers and his contributions were excellent, being patriotic, classical, comical, or dramatic, but never sentimental.
funeral orations projecting from their breast pockets; then a carriage containing the head surgeons and their cases of instruments; then eight private carriages containing consulting surgeons; then a hack containing a coroner; then the two hearses; then a carriage containing the head undertakers; then a train of assistants and mutes on foot; and after these came plodding through the fog a long procession of camp followers, police, and citizens generally.
Such in its strictly official eloquence is the form of funeral orations on ships that, perhaps wearied with a long struggle, or in some unguarded moment that may come to the readiest of us, had let themselves be overwhelmed by a sudden blow from the enemy.
My young family are not frivolous; they expend the entire amount of their allowance in subscriptions, under my direction; and they have attended as many public meetings and listened to as many lectures, orations, and discussions as generally fall to the lot of few grown people.
we shall make our little orations about him in the Common Council, I'll be bound; before we have time to look about us
He made heroic endeavors to keep on his legs, denounce his sister and consume a bit of orange peeling which he chewed between the times of his infantile orations.
He would mourn now, in a very solemn manner, that his own education had been neglected, and repeatedly point out, in pompous orations to Georgy, the necessity and excellence of classical acquirements.
of Quinctilian's Institutes, and of Cicero's Orations by Poggio in the monastery of St.
Young women old in the vices of the commonest and worst life, were expected to profess themselves enthralled by the good child's book, the Adventures of Little Margery, who resided in the village cottage by the mill; severely reproved and morally squashed the miller, when she was five and he was fifty; divided her porridge with singing birds; denied herself a new nankeen bonnet, on the ground that the turnips did not wear nankeen bonnets, neither did the sheep who ate them; who plaited straw and delivered the dreariest orations to all comers, at all sorts of unseasonable times.
She asked me the other day if I knew what your oration is to be about.
It is not necessary to set down the rest of the oration.
Chillip devoted to the delivery of this oration, my aunt eyed him narrowly.