oration

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o·ra·tion

 (ô-rā′shən, ō-rā′-)
n.
1. A formal speech, especially one given on a ceremonial occasion.
2. A speech delivered in a high-flown or pompous manner.

[Middle English oracion, prayer, from Late Latin ōrātiō, ōrātiōn-, from Latin, discourse, from ōrātus, past participle of ōrāre, to speak.]

oration

(ɔːˈreɪʃən)
n
1. a formal public declaration or speech
2. any rhetorical, lengthy, or pompous speech
3. (Education) an academic exercise or contest in public speaking
[C14: from Latin ōrātiō speech, harangue, from ōrāre to plead, pray]

o•ra•tion

(ɔˈreɪ ʃən, oʊˈreɪ-)

n.
a formal public speech, esp. for a special occasion.
[1325–75; Middle English oracion < Latin ōrātiō speech, prayer, derivative of ōrāre to plead, derivative of ōr-, s. of ōs mouth]
syn: See speech.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.oration - an instance of oratoryoration - an instance of oratory; "he delivered an oration on the decline of family values"
peroration - (rhetoric) the concluding section of an oration; "he summarized his main points in his peroration"
oratory - addressing an audience formally (usually a long and rhetorical address and often pompous); "he loved the sound of his own oratory"
peroration - a flowery and highly rhetorical oration

oration

noun speech, talk, address, lecture, discourse, harangue, homily, spiel (informal), disquisition, declamation a brief funeral oration

oration

noun
A usually formal oral communication to an audience:
Translations
خِطاب، خُطْبَه
tale
nyilvános beszéd
viîhafnarræîa
iškalbos menaskalbėtojasoracijaoratorinisoratoriškas
runasvinīga runa

oration

[ɔːˈreɪʃən] N (= speech) → discurso m; (= peroration) → arenga f
funeral orationoración f fúnebre

oration

[əˈreɪʃən] noraison f
a brief funeral oration → une brève oraison funèbre

oration

nAnsprache f; funeral orationGrabrede f

oration

[ɔːˈreɪʃn] norazione f
funeral oration → orazione funebre

oration

(əˈreiʃən) noun
a formal, public speech, especially in fine, beautiful language. a funeral oration.
orator (ˈorətə) noun
a person who makes public speeches, especially very eloquent ones.
ˈoratory (ˈorə-) noun
the art of speaking well in public.
oraˈtorical adjective
References in classic literature ?
Such in its strictly official eloquence is the form of funeral orations on ships that, perhaps wearied with a long struggle, or in some unguarded moment that may come to the readiest of us, had let themselves be overwhelmed by a sudden blow from the enemy.
He made heroic endeavors to keep on his legs, denounce his sister and consume a bit of orange peeling which he chewed between the times of his infantile orations.
She asked me the other day if I knew what your oration is to be about.
He had delivered a mel- ancholy oration previous to his funeral, and had doubtless in the packet of letters, presented vari- ous keepsakes to relatives.
Master Charmolue exhibited an alarming note book, and began to read, with many gestures and the exaggerated accentuation of the pleader, an oration in Latin, wherein all the proofs of the suit were piled up in Ciceronian periphrases, flanked with quotations from Plautus, his favorite comic author.
When Mrs Deborah, putting on the gravity of a judge, with somewhat more than his austerity, began an oration with the words, "You audacious strumpet
That was the funeral oration of one friend and client; and he could not help a certain apprehension lest the good name of another should be sucked down in the eddy of the scandal.
Pickwick's oration upon this occasion, together with the debate thereon, is entered on the Transactions of the Club.
In his oration for the bachelor's degree, he gives me to understand, he will treat of the classical myths, viewed in the aspect of baby stories, and has a great mind to discuss the expediency of using up the whole of ancient history, for the same purpose.
There was to be a political meeting at the market hall, in the neighboring town; and the member was expected to make an oration, passing in review contemporary events at home and abroad.
My knowin' better doesn't make any difference with legal truth; it wasn't my funeral and I wasn't invited to deliver an oration.
He is vain and blustering, refusing to discourse unless he is paid, fond of making an oration, and hoping thereby to escape the inevitable Socrates; but a mere child in argument, and unable to foresee that the next "move" (to use a Platonic expression) will "shut him up.