Organisms


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Organisms


Biology, Physiology. the synthesis in living organisms of more complex substances from simpler ones. Cf. catabolism. — anabolic, adj.
a relationship or association between two or more organisms that is harmful to one of them. Cf. symbiosis.
the formation of chemical compounds by living organisms, either by synthesis or degradation. — biosynthetic, adj.
the science or study of biotypes, or organisms sharing the same hereditary characteristics. — biotypologic, biotypological, adj.
Biology, Physiology. the destructive processes of chemical ehange in living organisms, characterized by the breaking down of complex substances into simpler ones, with a release of energy. Cf. anabolism. — catabolic, adj.
1. the branch of biology that studies tissues of organisms.
2. the structure, especially the microscopic structure, of organic tissues. Also histiology.histologist, n.histologie, histological, adj.
any one of a large variety of microscopic or ultramicroscopic organisms, as bacteria, viruses, etc.
the theory that all organisms are descended from one original organism. — monogenetic, adj.
any living thing or anything that resembles a living thing in complexity of structure or function.
the study of the effects of climate on animal and plant life. — phenologist, phaenologist, n. — phenologic, phaenologic, phenological, phaenological, adj.
a relationship or association between two or more organisms that is harmful to none of them. — symbiotic, adj.
1. abiogenesis; spontaneous generation.
2. metagenesis, or alternation of generations.
3. production of an offspring entirely different from either of the parents. Also xenogeny.xenogenic, — xenogenetic, adj.
xenogenesis.
the state or quality of being bilaterally symmetrical, as certain organisms. — zygomorphic, zygomorphous, adj.
References in classic literature ?
As, therefore, in the case of animate bodies and organisms a certain magnitude is necessary, and a magnitude which may be easily embraced in one view; so in the plot, a certain length is necessary, and a length which can be easily embraced by the memory.
It is the differentiation to which all organisms grow.
There is no such thing as dead, inert matter: it is all alive; all instinct with force, actual and potential; all sensitive to the same forces in its environment and susceptible to the contagion of higher and subtler ones residing in such superior organisms as it may be brought into relation with, as those of man when he is fashioning it into an instrument of his will.
I may add, that as some organisms will breed most freely under the most unnatural conditions (for instance, the rabbit and ferret kept in hutches), showing that their reproductive system has not been thus affected; so will some animals and plants withstand domestication or cultivation, and vary very slightly--perhaps hardly more than in a state of nature.
Between two such organisms one would not have expected to find the slightest temperamental accord.
Nietzsche, recognising this same truth, would ascribe practically all the importance to the "highest functionaries in the organism, in which the life-will appears as an active and formative principle," and except in certain cases (where passive organisms alone are concerned) would not give such a prominent place to the influence of environment.
In this lecture we shall be concerned with a very general characteristic which broadly, though not absolutely, distinguishes the behaviour of living organisms from that of dead matter.
Another fact of which he became convinced, after reading many scientific books, was that the men who shared his views had no other construction to put on them, and that they gave no explanation of the questions which he felt he could not live without answering, but simply ignored their existence and attempted to explain other questions of no possible interest to him, such as the evolution of organisms, the materialistic theory of consciousness, and so forth.
A village is an organism, conscious of its several parts, as a town is not.
No other industrial organism of equal size owes foreign countries so little.
He is then immediately taken from his proud yet sorrowing parents and adopted by some childless Equilateral, who is bound by oath never to permit the child henceforth to enter his former home or so much as to look upon his relations again, for fear lest the freshly developed organism may, by force of unconscious imitation, fall back again into his hereditary level.
They did it as a standing horse paws with his foot, or as a man enjoys killing animals in sport: because ancient and departed necessities had impressed it on the organism.

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