coordinate system

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coordinate system

n.
A method of representing points in a space of given dimensions by coordinates.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.coordinate system - a system that uses coordinates to establish position
organization, arrangement, organisation, system - an organized structure for arranging or classifying; "he changed the arrangement of the topics"; "the facts were familiar but it was in the organization of them that he was original"; "he tried to understand their system of classification"
Cartesian coordinate system - a coordinate system for which the coordinates of a point are its distances from a set perpendicular lines that intersect at the origin of the system
coordinate axis - one of the fixed reference lines of a coordinate system
inertial frame, inertial reference frame - a coordinate system in which Newton's first law of motion is valid
space-time, space-time continuum - the four-dimensional coordinate system (3 dimensions of space and 1 of time) in which physical events are located
References in periodicals archive ?
As a result there is the matrix with the columns containing values of functionals for the different values of line distance from the origin of coordinates.
This law is due to the fact that the element content Y when estimated in relation to 1 gram-atom, in any chemical combination with molecular mass X, may be described by the adduced equations for the positive branches of the rectangular hyperbolas of the type Y = K/X (where Y [less than or equal to] 1, K [less than or equal to] X), arranged in the order of increasing nuclear charge, and having the common virtual axis with their peaks tending to the state Y =1 or K =X as they become further removed from the origin of coordinates, reaching a maximum atomic mass designating the last element.
Thus, (1) is a special case of a general expression in which the origin of coordinates is arbitrary and the distance from the origin to another point does not take the same value as the coordinate designating it.
First, we can study, for instance, the distribution of rational number rays, drawn from the origin of coordinates in the Minkowski lattice.
If this object permanently moves round the origin of coordinates, the following relation can be written.

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