orphan drug

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Related to Orphan drugs: orphan disease

or′phan drug′


n.
a drug that remains undeveloped or is neglected because of limited potential for commercial gain.
[1975–80]
References in periodicals archive ?
Survey says orphan drugs are getting strong backing
com/research/76e982/orphan_drugs_in_as) has announced the addition of the "Orphan Drugs in Asia: Guidelines and Regulatory Requirements to Help Orphan Drug Products Enter the Asian Market 2011" book to their offering.
com/research/eeb6e6/personalized_medic) has announced the addition of the "Personalized Medicine & Orphan Drugs Review and Outlook 2010" report to their offering.
The US government introduced the Orphan Drugs Act (ODA) in 1983 as a means to provide incentives to drug developers so that they would develop treatments for diseases for which incidence is so low that normal market forces are unable to deliver effective medication for these conditions.
com/research/eaee20/orphan_drugs_in_as) has announced the addition of the "Orphan Drugs in Asia 2010: Guidelines and Regulatory Requirements to Help Orphan Drug Products Enter the Asian Market" report to their offering.
A major new report Orphan Drugs in Asia-Pacific: From designation to pricing, funding and market access focuses on five developed markets in the region: Japan, South Korea, Taiwan, Singapore and Australia.
com/research/168d0d/orphan_drugs_in_as) has announced the addition of the "Orphan Drugs in Asia: Guidelines and Regulatory Requirements to Help Orphan Drug Products Enter the Asian Market 2009" report to their offering.
com/reports/c58292) has announced the addition of "Orphan Drugs in Asia: Guidelines and Regulatory Requirements to Help Orphan Drug Products Enter the Asian Market 2007" to their offering.
Developers of orphan drugs are granted seven years of marketing exclusivity after approval of their orphan drug product as well as tax incentives for clinical research they have undertaken.
The Orphan Drugs Act provides for economic incentives to encourage the development of drugs for diseases affecting fewer than 200,000 people in the United States.