Orphic


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Related to Orphic: Orphic Mysteries

Or·phic

 (ôr′fĭk)
adj.
1. Greek Mythology Of or ascribed to Orpheus: the Orphic poems; Orphic mysteries.
2. Of, relating to, or characteristic of the dogmas, mysteries, and philosophical principles set forth in the poems ascribed to Orpheus.
3. Capable of casting a charm or spell; entrancing.
4. often orphic Mystic or occult.

[Greek Orphikos, from Orpheus, Orpheus.]

Or′phi·cal·ly adv.

Orphic

(ˈɔːfɪk)
adj
1. (Classical Myth & Legend) of or relating to Orpheus or Orphism
2. (sometimes not capital) mystical or occult
ˈOrphically adv

Or•phic

(ˈɔr fɪk)

adj.
1. of or pertaining to Orphism or to the body of literature, attributed to Orpheus.
2. (often l.c.) mystic; oracular.
3. (often l.c.) entrancing: Orphic music.
Or′phi•cal•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.Orphic - ascribed to Orpheus or characteristic of ideas in works ascribed to Orpheus
2.orphic - having an import not apparent to the senses nor obvious to the intelligence; beyond ordinary understanding; "mysterious symbols"; "the mystical style of Blake"; "occult lore"; "the secret learning of the ancients"
esoteric - confined to and understandable by only an enlightened inner circle; "a compilation of esoteric philosophical theories"
References in classic literature ?
Very different in character is the "Hymn to Ares", which is Orphic in character.
It found its way into Hellas probably through the medium of Orphic and Pythagorean rites and mysteries.
For further information: Michelle Hefley, Orphic Therapeutics,Inc.
In a press conference, Mendoni said that the scene in the mosaic, recounting the abduction of Persephone, is indeed "linked with the cults of the underworld, the Orphic cult-descent into Hades and the Dionysian rites.
The well-known story of Orpheus as referred to in the Ashbery poem ends in a kind of apotheosis, so the entire work is set in the frame of the Orphic cult that grew up around the musician when, after his dismemberment, his head, still singing, floated across the Aegean Sea from Greece to Asia Minor, and its burial place became a shrine.
This is a presentiment of the disjunction between the conclusion to the sequence and that of Jensen's novella--whereas Hanold happily finds his Eurydice through the delusion surrounding Gradiva, Vega's katabasis ends in Orphic loss and dismemberment: 'You who were constellation, / .
He says of "Aubade," "The poem does not hold the lyre up in the face of the gods of the underworld; it does not make the Orphic effort to haul life back up the slope against all the odds" (158).
In this way, the interview narrates the evolution of Koestenbaum's style, one interested in fragmentation, the Orphic utterance, dream logic, the multi-form self, and a great host of Steinian tonal and linguistic concerns, perhaps best illustrated in his latest volume Blue Stranger with Mosaic Background.
This section studies the case of poets, Garcilaso de la Vega (Third Ecglogue) and Jorge de Montemayor (La Diana), who present themselves as orphic voices.
53) This theme in Blanchot is discussed extensively by Derrida and others, notably by Robert McGahey in The Orphic Moment: Shaman to Poet- Thinker in Plato, Nietzsche, and Mallarme (Albany: SUNY Press, 1994), 127-35.
The first of these sections, "Double Lives," comprises one long essay with the orphic title "Dinner at the Caf6 Marliave" (and opens with extended set of directions about how to reach the Boston restaurant of that name, no less).
of the promenade corresponding to Le Corbusier's own Orphic leanings and one orthodox that fitted the Dominicans' needs.