mason bee

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Related to Osmia: mason bees

mason bee

n.
Any of various solitary bees of the family Megachilidae that build nests from mud, chewed leaves, or resin.

mason bee

n
(Animals) any bee of the family Megachilidae that builds a hard domelike nest of sand, clay, etc, held together with saliva
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.mason bee - any of numerous solitary bees that build nests of hardened mud and sandmason bee - any of numerous solitary bees that build nests of hardened mud and sand
bee - any of numerous hairy-bodied insects including social and solitary species
family Megachilidae, Megachilidae - leaf-cutting and mason bees
References in periodicals archive ?
Development and emergence of the orchard pollinator Osmia lignaria (Hymenoptera: Megachilidae).
Also, the Swedish study found that wild Osmia bicornis bees nested at six of the eight untreated sites but at none of the treated ones.
2005), the xylocopine Ceratina calcarata (Rehan and Richards, 2010), and the megachilids Osmia rufa (Seidelmann, 2006; Seidelmann et al.
Additional frequent visitors to blowout penstemon flowers, thought to be the common pollinators of Penstemon, include four species of megachilid bees (Hoplitis pilosifrons Cresson, Osmia cyaneonitens Cockerell, O.
Working on multiple floral visitors, Adler and Irwin [26] observed that Xylocopa, Osmia and Habropoda carried the most Gelsemium sempervirens (Carolina jessamine; Loganiaceae) pollen, followed by Bombus and Apis.
They then fed the pollen to larvae of two closely related generalist species of mason bee (Osmia bicornis and Osmia cornuta) to see how well the larvae developed.
He says species of pastured pollinators could include, for example, the blue orchard bee, Osmia lignaria.
One highly diverse bee group that was attracted to both plant types in the spring was the Megachilidae, especially members of the genera Megachile and Osmia.
Scaling up production is also Cane's challenge in working with a related bee, Osmia aglaia.
One, a leaf-cutter bee in the genus Osmia, is in the same family (Megachilidae) as the Anthidium bee and has similar traits.
A 56-year-old Hispanic man with a recent history of myocardial infarction was referred to the otolaryngology service with a 3-month history of bilateral nasal obstruction and an osmia that had not responded to medical therapy.