Ossianism

Related to Ossianism: The Works of Ossian

Ossianism

writing in the style of Ossian and particularly writing in the epic or legendary vein which is of a recent period but which claims to belong to antiquity. [After Ossian or Oisin, an apocryphal Gaelic poet of the third century, whose supposed style was imitated in works created by James Macpherson (1736-1796).] — Ossianic, adj.
See also: Literary Style
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Writers such as Sydney Owenson or Charles Robert Maturin decided to follow the interest in Ossianism and the sublime, as well as to use wild landscapes, and popular superstitions together with "native insurgency" to produce the Irish version of Gothic fiction (Kilfeather 2005: 80).
Byron's early Ossianism, if a touch naive, cannot be read without an awareness of Scott's involvement in the Macpherson controversy.
Researchers have so far not been interested in this aspect, concentrating instead solely on the later Ossianism of the Czech National Revival, particularly the relationship between Ossian's poems and the Forged Manuscripts of the Revivalists (the Rukopis kralovedvorsky and the Rukopis zelenohorsky).
13) In view of these facts, it is hard to imagine a more influential and more numerous forum in which to disseminate Ossianism in the Bohemian Lands, a forum that undoubtedly prepared the ground also for the later Ossianism of the Czech National Revival.
Only the Jungmann generation made Ossian a topic in Czech as well, thus launching the second stage of Ossianism in the Bohemian Lands, which lasted till the end of the nineteenth century.
In this paper, by outlining the developments, I have sought to demonstrate that an important role in the formation of Revivalist Ossianism was played by August Gottlieb Meissner, who otherwise remains completely neglected in this respect.
The claim about the minor importance of Ossian for German literary studies in the Bohemian Lands is based on the secondary literature (Murko, Deutsche Einflusse, and Otruba, Rukopisy), which was only marginally interested in Ossianism in German essays.
28) In Czech Ossianism it was, according to Prochazka, not primarily a matter of adopting matter and subjects: 'Neither the four German translations of "Ossian", which the Revivalists of Jungmann's generation had at their disposal, nor even the Czech translation by Josef Hollmann from 1827 had any effect on the development of Czech literature at the time.
10) Certainly Ossianism helped to mould Zhukovsky's poetic taste.
When Bowring encountered Zhukovsky's Pevets his own Ossianic tendencies were stimulated and focused by the restrained and muted Ossianism of the Russian poem.
In Pevets Bowring correctly recognized a subtly Ossianic mood piece, but in his undiscriminating enthusiasm he exaggerated the Ossianism that he found and reworked Zhukovsky's poem to its detriment as he tried to fit it to his own concept.