Oudry


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Oudry

(French udri)
n
(Biography) Jean-Baptiste (ʒɑ̃batist). 1686–1755, French rococo painter and tapestry designer, noted esp for animal and hunting scenes
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It also shows how a tranche of petites-maitres --from Carle van Loo and Charles-Antoine Coypel, who are usually associated with portraiture and fancy pictures, to the animalier Jean-Baptiste Oudry and the history and classical painter Francois Lemoyne--kept religious art as a regular part of their practice.
Jean-Baptiste Oudry, Hunting Scene (Jagdstuck), which is the work Hunting Piece by the same artist in the 1950 MFAA inventory at number '2006/2' (the number remains at present on the back of the painting), Hildebrand having five years earlier claimed to have acquired it in Paris in 1942; (45)
Estos anuncios no se limitaban a libros, sino tambien a laminas vendidas sueltas, lo que nos revela que las pinturas de animales se habian convertido en un poderoso elemento decorativo, aunque la tradicion pictorica animalistica espanola fuese practicamente inexistente, no existiendo en nuestro pais ninguna figura comparable a Jean Baptista Oudry o George Stubbs.
Polemicas de esta naturaleza ya se habian vivido en la Manufactura Real de Beauvais a proposito de los cartones de Jean Baptiste Oudry (3) y volveran a provocarse en Los Gobelinos de Paris con las obras de Delacroix (4).
Chapter 4 hurries through the history of animal illustration, concentrating on La Fontaine, Oudry, and Buffon.
During a 1749 engagement at Paris's Saint Germain fair, an annual Dionysian event improbably held during Lent, Clara was visited by the French artist and noted workaholic Jean-Baptiste Oudry, who scrupulously studied her form before embarking on an enormous, life-size rendering of the fabled creature.
These include masterpieces by the artists Rembrandt, Titian, Klimt, Matisse, Turner, Girardon, and Oudry.
8 - A still life work by Jean Baptiste Oudry valued at pounds 5m was stolen from a private estate in Norfolk in 1992.
A still-life by Jean Baptiste Oudry valued at pounds 5million was stolen from a private estate in Norfolk in 1992.
In place of the aristocratic, seemingly untouched game birds favored by such painters as Jan Baptist Weenix and Jacques-Charles Oudry seen elsewhere in the exhibition, a scrawny dead rooster hangs by one foot and appears to dangle in front of the picture plane, its intact tail feathers a brilliant white plume against a green door.
Many people find distasteful the few early still-life paintings in which Chardin, following the example of such sporting artists as Jan Weenix and Jean-Baptiste Oudry, depicted the spoils of the chase: sad dead creatures bleeding into their fur or their plumage.