Ouse River


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Related to Ouse River: Severn River, Mouse River

Ouse River

 (o͞oz)
1. also Great Ouse River A river, about 240 km (150 mi) long, rising in south-central England and meandering east and northeast to the Wash, an inlet of the North Sea.
2. A river, about 100 km (60 mi) long, of northeast England flowing southeast to join the Trent River and form the Humber River. It is an important commercial waterway.
Word History: Ouse is a perfectly appropriate name for a river, but one whose etymological meaning is likely to raise a smile. The name of these two rivers is derived from the Celtic languages that were spoken in England before the arrival of the Anglo-Saxons in the British Isles. Their Celtic name, Ūsa, is derived from *udso-, "water," which is in turn derived from the Indo-European root *wed-, "wet, water." The same root *wed- gives us the English words water and wet as well. Thus the Ouse River etymologically is the "Water River" or the "Wet River." Of course, the speakers of early forms of the English language who borrowed the name from the Celts did not know the meaning of the word—as is rather frequently the case when foreign topographical terms are borrowed.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Ouse River - a river in northeastern England that flows generally southeastward to join the Trent River and form the HumberOuse River - a river in northeastern England that flows generally southeastward to join the Trent River and form the Humber
England - a division of the United Kingdom
References in periodicals archive ?
were among the junk dragged from the Great Ouse river in Bedford when it was cleaned up last year.
ZANDERS are east European predators brought to England in 1963 when the former Great Ouse River Authority started a national row by putting 97 small ones in the Ouse Relief Channel.
In 1963 the Great Ouse River Authority introduced them into the water course.