outport

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outport

(ˈaʊtˌpɔːt)
n
1. chiefly Brit a subsidiary port built in deeper water than the original port
2. Canadian one of the many isolated fishing villages located in the bays and other indentations of the Newfoundland coast
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.outport - a subsidiary port built in deeper water than the original port (but usually farther from the center of trade)
port - a place (seaport or airport) where people and merchandise can enter or leave a country
Britain, Great Britain, U.K., UK, United Kingdom, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland - a monarchy in northwestern Europe occupying most of the British Isles; divided into England and Scotland and Wales and Northern Ireland; `Great Britain' is often used loosely to refer to the United Kingdom
Translations
References in classic literature ?
With the exception of one or two outports in France, and an occasional visit to Portsmouth, Plymouth, and Deal, he had in reality seen no more of mankind, however, than if he had been riding a donkey in one of his native mines.
Okihiro shows deftly how this low rate of serious offences is maintained not by external legislation and police interference, but by the long-established informal means of social control which resolve tension and conflict in outports, penalizing deviants through gossip, backbiting and social exclusion.
Some from remote outports had never been away from home.
In Observing the Outports, Jeff Webb explores the interdisciplinary collaboration of scholars at Memorial University who "invented Newfoundland studies" (4) in the period from the 1960s to the 1980s.
In the outports that dot the coastline of rural Newfoundland, the individual church buildings are a key part of local identity.
Bien que par la suite Peacock ait visite six fois la province et qu'il ait fini par publier un recueil en trois volumes des Songs of the Newfoundland Outports (1965), c'est Sargent qui avait lance le programme de recherche en chansons folkloriques du Musee dans cette province.
By 1992 overfishing resulted in the declaration of a moratorium, and the formal economy of the outports faced imminent collapse.
Small towns like Trinity, nestled in bays and inlets along Newfoundland's coast, are called outports.
This means, of course, that if the children so chose, there might possibly be a considerable shift of population within Newfoundland, presumably from the fishing outports to other locations, without violating any basic tenet of Newfoundland philosophy.
The unspoken consensus seemed to be that the outports, along with the codfish, might well be doomed.
His three volume Songs of the Newfoundland Outports (1965) was the largest single folksong publication pertaining to one province.
For centuries the residents of Newfoundland outports nurtured a lifestyle which was tied to nature and its cycles.