overread

overread

(ˌəʊvəˈriːd)
vb (tr) , -reads, -reading or -read
to read over or reread
adj
1. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) (of a book) read too much
2. (Education) (of a person) excessively educated
References in periodicals archive ?
Noting that it was "important not to overread Clapper," the Remijas court distinguished the Supreme Court case by stating that "Clapper was addressing speculative harm based on something that may not even have happened to some or all of the plaintiffs," whereas the Neiman Marcus customers definitely knew of the increased risk, because Neiman Marcus itself had alerted them to the cyberattack.
And yet, because we largely ignore the treatment of children and overread parental rights, widespread corporal punishment persists.
Many overread this point and contend that ATP says that deterring litigation of any kind is always permissible.
We have to handle them upfront first and foremost, not give them any cheap yards around the fringes, keep a tight rein on Cipriani and try to get their centres to overread in defence.
One question we might pose is: "Should ER physicians have their ultrasound studies overread, just as a radiologist would overread their plain-film interpretations from the previous evening, to ensure that nothing significant had been missed?
Elkins's formulation implies that pictures themselves contain no narrative meaning, that narrative is somehow outside the picture altogether, and that to discuss narrative in conjunction with painting is to work counter to the ontology of the picture, to turn painting into something other than what it is--in short, to overread.
Many tears on MRIs do not correlate with the physical exam; in other words, the MRI may have been overread (something stated that is actually not there or is less than stated).
In a short concurrence, Justice Stephen Breyer, clearly uneasy with the Roberts opinion he was joining, cautioned that it should not be overread.
It's a notion perhaps overread and overintuited (it wouldn't be the first time I've been accused of that) but not improbable.
COMMENT Although some physicians continue to interpret x-rays without a radiology overread, this practice opens up a significant avenue for liability.
Likewise, Dix's ironic detachment has been overread in stark contrast to the excessive emotionality attributed to Kollwitz.
Karen O'Brien argues that the use of "history" on title pages of fiction indicates the fictional works "clearly had thematic and cognitive preoccupations in common with history proper," but "that novelists' often highly ironized statements of factual accuracy should not be overread as a general indication of the epistemological adventurousness of eighteenth-century culture.