repetitive strain injury

(redirected from Overuse syndrome)
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repetitive strain injury

n. Abbr. RSI
Damage to tendons, nerves, and other soft tissues that is caused by the repeated performance of a limited number of physical movements and is characterized by numbness, pain, and a wasting and weakening of muscles.

repetitive strain injury

or

repetitive stress injury

n
(Pathology) a condition, characterized by arm or wrist pains, that can affect musicians, computer operators, etc, who habitually perform awkward hand movements. Abbreviation: RSI
Translations

repetitive strain injury

nVerletzung fdurch wiederholte Belastung

repetitive strain injury

n (Med) → lesione f da sforzo ripetuto
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References in periodicals archive ?
Fry HJH: Incidence of overuse syndrome in the symphony orchestra.
Repetitive strain injury (RSI) is also known as repetitive movement injury, occupational overuse syndrome and cumulative trauma disorder, according to Gregory Fox, a Boston chiropractor specializing in computer-related injuries.
Ignoring these warning signs sets the stage for chronic overuse syndrome and injury.
You still have the overuse syndrome in young kids,'' Strasser said.
Alan Lockwood surveyed 2,112 members of the International Conference of Symphony and Opera Musicians (ICSOM) and found that their playing-related problems fell into four basic categories: (1) overuse syndrome, (2) neural impingement, (3) focal dystonias, and (4) psychological stress.
The funds will be used to conduct clinical research with upper-extremity amputees to demonstrate that PhysioNetics' Vari-Pinch Prehensor (V2P) reduces cumulative injury and overuse syndrome among users.
Impact of a guideline application on the prevention of occupational overuse syndrome for computer users.
Without a prosthesis there is the risk of Overuse Syndrome, also referred to as Repetitive Stress Injuries (RSI), which is associated with unilateral hand loss and excessive use of the intact hand.
Overuse syndrome, as well as tendinitis, bursitis, strains and sprains can put a halt to a golfer's game.
Other areas in which AAPB members are working that are particularly relevant to musicians include improving elite performance in athletes and artists, managing stress, treating overuse syndrome, preventing injury, managing breathing and hyperventilation as it impairs health and performance, and using brain wave biofeedback to help enhance peak performance and improve concentration.
Chapters provide information about general anatomy, specific anatomy--hand, upper limb and spine--biomechanics, hand functions, neurophysiology, psychology, epidemiology, occupational disorders, overuse syndrome, focal dystonia, posture, the role of surgery, vision problems, stage fright, rehabilitation with musicians, the handicapped musician, orofacial problems, prevention and "healthy" techniques reviewed by instrumentalists, specifically violinists and pianists.
Manufactured with quality materials and attention to the slightest detail, Neck Sofa continues to impress experts in the field of neck health and posture issues, especially those now seeing patients with symptoms of "Text Neck" Syndrome, an overuse syndrome resulting from excessive strain on the spine from looking in a forward and downward position at any hand held mobile device.