Oxford


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Related to Oxford: Oxford English Dictionary

Ox·ford

 (ŏks′fərd)
1. A city of south-central England on the Thames River west-northwest of London. The internationally famous Oxford University, founded in the 1100s, still dominates the city center.
2. A city of northern Mississippi south-southeast of Memphis, Tennessee. It is the seat of the University of Mississippi ("Ole Miss"), established in 1844, and was William Faulkner's home town.

Oxford

, 17th Earl of Title of Edward de Vere. 1550-1604.
English courtier and poet who is believed by some to have written Shakespeare's plays.

ox·ford

 (ŏks′fərd)
n.
1. A sturdy, low shoe that laces over the instep.
2. A cotton cloth of a tight basket weave, used primarily for shirts.

[After OxfordEngland.]

Oxford

(ˈɒksfəd)
n
1. (Placename) a city in S England, administrative centre of Oxfordshire, at the confluence of the Rivers Thames and Cherwell: Royalist headquarters during the Civil War; seat of Oxford University, consisting of 40 separate colleges, the oldest being University College (1249), and Oxford Brookes University (1993); motor-vehicle industry. Pop: 143 016 (2001).
2. (Breeds) Also called: Oxford Down a breed of sheep with middle-length wool and a dark brown face and legs
3. (Clothing & Fashion) a type of stout laced shoe with a low heel
4. (Textiles) a lightweight fabric of plain or twill weave used esp for men's shirts

Oxford

(ˈɒksfəd)
n
(Biography) 1st Earl of. title of (Robert) Harley

ox•ford

(ˈɒks fərd)

n.
1. a low shoe laced over the instep.
2. Also called ox′ford cloth`. a cotton or synthetic fabric constructed in plain or basket weave and having a lustrous finish and soft hand, used for shirts, blouses, and sportswear.
[1900–05; after Oxford, England]

Ox•ford

(ˈɒks fərd)

n.
1. a city in S Oxfordshire, in S England, NW of London: university, founded in 12th century. 132,000.
3. Also called Ox′ford Down′. one of an English breed of large sheep.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.oxford - a city in southern England to the northwest of LondonOxford - a city in southern England to the northwest of London; site of Oxford University
Oxford University, Oxford - a university in England
England - a division of the United Kingdom
Oxonian - a native or resident of Oxford
2.Oxford - a university town in northern Mississippi; home of William Faulkner
Empire State of the South, Georgia, Peach State, GA - a state in southeastern United States; one of the Confederate states during the American Civil War
3.oxford - a university in EnglandOxford - a university in England    
Oxford - a city in southern England to the northwest of London; site of Oxford University
4.oxford - a low shoe laced over the instep
saddle oxford, saddle shoe - an oxford with a saddle of contrasting color
shoe - footwear shaped to fit the foot (below the ankle) with a flexible upper of leather or plastic and a sole and heel of heavier material
Translations
Oxford
オックスフォード
Oxford

oxford

[ˈɒksfəd] N (US) → zapato m (de tacón bajo)

Oxford

nOxford nt; my brother is at Oxfordmein Bruder studiert in Oxford

Oxford

:
Oxford bags
plsehr weite Hosen pl
Oxford blue
n Mitglied eines Oxforder Studentensportklubs, das für die Universität angetreten ist
Oxford English
nOxford-Englisch nt
Oxford shoe
ngeschnürter Halbschuh
References in classic literature ?
The young divine, whose scholar-like renown still lived in Oxford, was considered by his more fervent admirers as little less than a heavenly ordained apostle, destined, should he live and labour for the ordinary term of life, to do as great deeds, for the now feeble New England Church, as the early Fathers had achieved for the infancy of the Christian faith.
1] Edward Bouverie Pusey (1800-1882), champion of the orthodoxy of revealed religion, defender of the Oxford movement, and Regius professor of Hebrew and Canon of Christ Church, Oxford.
Frank comes tomorrowI had a letter this morningwe see him tomorrow by dinnertime to a certainty he is at Oxford today, and he comes for a whole fortnight; I knew it would be so.
I was therefore entered at Oxford and have been properly idle ever since.
Well, I am what they call an Oxford man,' he returned; 'that is to say, I get bored to death down there, periodically - and I am on my way now to my mother's.
To make it fair, Ruskin had relit the seven lamps of architecture, and written the seven labours of Hercules; for these windows through a whole youth Burne Jones had worshipped painted glass at Oxford, and to breathe romance into these frescos had Rossetti been born, and Dante born again.
The whole resembled the form of the letter T, or some of those ancient dinner-tables, which, arranged on the same principles, may be still seen in the antique Colleges of Oxford or Cambridge.
I don't think I shall send it anywhere," he answered, tossing his head back in that odd way that used to make his friends laugh at him at Oxford.
There were one or two cartloads of refugees passing along Oxford Street, and several in the Marylebone Road, but so slowly was the news spreading that Regent Street and Port- land Place were full of their usual Sunday-night promenaders, albeit they talked in groups, and along the edge of Regent's Park there were as many silent couples "walking out" together under the scattered gas lamps as ever there had been.
It is not the object of this work to give a description of Derbyshire, nor of any of the remarkable places through which their route thither lay; Oxford, Blenheim, Warwick, Kenilworth, Birmingham, &c.
had just surrendered to the parliamentary troops, whilst Oxford and Newark still held out for him in the hopes of coming to some arrangement.
Lo, here stand the Lord and Lady of the May, whom I, a clerk of Oxford, and high priest of Merry Mount, am presently to join in holy matrimony.