asphyxia

(redirected from Oxygen deprivation)
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as·phyx·i·a

 (ăs-fĭk′sē-ə)
n.
A condition in which an extreme decrease in the concentration of oxygen in the body accompanied by an increase in the concentration of carbon dioxide leads to loss of consciousness or death. Asphyxia can be induced by choking, drowning, electric shock, injury, or the inhalation of toxic gases.

[New Latin, from Greek asphuxiā, stopping of the pulse : a-, not; see a-1 + sphuxis, heartbeat (from sphuzein, sphug-, to throb).]

asphyxia

(æsˈfɪksɪə)
n
(Pathology) lack of oxygen in the blood due to restricted respiration; suffocation. If severe enough and prolonged, it causes death
[C18: from New Latin, from Greek asphuxia a stopping of the pulse, from a-1 + sphuxis pulse, from sphuzein to throb]
asˈphyxial adj

as•phyx•i•a

(æsˈfɪk si ə)

n.
an extreme condition usu. involving loss of consciousness caused by lack of oxygen and excess of carbon dioxide in the blood, as from suffocation.
[1700–10; < New Latin < Greek asphyxía a stopping of the pulse]
as•phyx′i•al, adj.

as·phyx·i·a

(ăs-fĭk′sē-ə)
Suffocation resulting from a severe drop in the level of oxygen in the body, leading to loss of consciousness and sometimes death.

asphyxia

- Its original meaning was stoppage of the pulse.
See also related terms for pulse.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.asphyxia - a condition in which insufficient or no oxygen and carbon dioxide are exchanged on a ventilatory basisasphyxia - a condition in which insufficient or no oxygen and carbon dioxide are exchanged on a ventilatory basis; caused by choking or drowning or electric shock or poison gas
physical condition, physiological condition, physiological state - the condition or state of the body or bodily functions
hypoxia - oxygen deficiency causing a very strong drive to correct the deficiency
hypercapnia, hypercarbia - the physical condition of having the presence of an abnormally high level of carbon dioxide in the circulating blood
Translations

asphyxia

[æsˈfɪksɪə] Nasfixia f

asphyxia

[æsˈfɪksɪə] nasphyxie f

asphyxia

nErstickung f, → Asphyxie f (spec)

asphyxia

[æsˈfɪksɪə] nasfissia

as·phyx·i·a

n. asfixia, sofocación, falta de respiración;
___ fetalis___ del feto.

asphyxia

n asfixia
References in periodicals archive ?
The technique uses magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to map regions of oxygen deprivation within tumours.
Two died during delivery and five had to transferred to Dublin for emergency treatment after evidence of oxygen deprivation.
But it can also cause oxygen deprivation, asphyxiation, brain damage and damage to the nervous system.
A pathologist recorded the cause of death as oxygen deprivation to the brain, caused by a heart attack.
British authorities however, have warned that nitrous oxide abuse could lead to oxygen deprivation resulting in loss of blood pressure, fainting and heart attacks.
Abusing nitrous oxide can lead to oxygen deprivation resulting in loss of blood pressure, fainting, and even heart attacks.
The document, called Neonatal Encephalopathy and Neurologic Outcome, updates a version published in 2003 that focused on oxygen deprivation, or asphyxia, around the time of birth.
Also remember that this flight was a red-eye, most passengers would be trying to sleep, masking alarming effects of oxygen deprivation.
This situation can even lead to further complications like oxygen deprivation for the baby, morning sickness, vaginal bleeding, high blood pressure and protein in the urine after 20 weeks of pregnancy (preeclampsia), restricted fetal growth, complicated labor, need for a C-section, premature birth, low birth weight and in extreme cases, the baby's life might be in jeopardy.
Ms Chappell's lawyers claimed the management of her labour was "inadequate" and that Callum suffered avoidable hypoxia, a form of oxygen deprivation, that caused his debilitating condition.
The company's lead product, SANGUINATE(TM), is in clinical testing, focused on treating the comorbidities of sickle cell disease and other disorders where oxygen deprivation due to hemolysis and/or ischemia occurs.
The latest report of the Perinatal and Maternal Mortality Review Committe, which was released last month and examined data from 2011, states the overall reduction is likely to be due to a reduction in the rate of babies dying during labour and dying from oxygen deprivation around the time of birth.