POTUS


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POTUS

abbr.
President of the United States

POTUS

(ˈpəʊtəs)
n acronym for
(in the US) President of the United States
References in periodicals archive ?
The POTUS, who appeared visibly discontented with Democrats' apparent unenthusiastic response, said they were "like death" when they remained stone faced through the majority of his speech, while the Republicans cheered endlessly.
Almost every night Jimmy Falon, on The Tonight Show, mimics the POTUS and pokes fun at him.
Whatever policies Donald Trump pursues as POTUS, he won't wage political war against religious institutions.
Clinton tweeted out a response to the Obama announcement, saying, "Honored to have you with me POTUS.
The conversation will be driven mostly by my questions, but we've reserved a chunk of time for yours - things you'd ask if it were you instead of me sitting across from POTUS.
While Chicago is the birthplace of presumptive Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton and the adopted hometown of POTUS no.
Soon our office began to refer to President Obama and Mrs Obama as the White House staff do: POTUS and FLOTUS, which stands for President of the United States and First Lady of the United States.
He added that from area transportation, to lodging, and direct fleet support to ships with Joint Task Force (JTF) POTUS Support, "we ensured the President and Secretary of State received everything and anything they needed in order to accomplish their mission.
Here's what you need to know from today's briefing by Robert Gibbs and President Obama: POTUS made a surprise appearance at the top of the briefing to walk back his comments on the arrest of Henry Louis Gates Jr.
Haught was in Tulsa to promote his new book "The POTUS Chronicles: Bubba Between the Bushes," which looks at the last three presidents.
Throughout the developing event, SrA Jaeger consistently exceeded every Air Force and National Weather Service standard, ensuring the safekeeping of not only Fort Hood and its over 60,000 personnel, but POTUS as well.
analyzes the US presidential elections form 1980 to 2000 to find how presidential hopefuls use televised advertising as a strategic tool and weapon to create their own images and make the other candidate appear not to be POTUS material.