prism

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prism

 (prĭz′əm)
n.
1. A solid figure whose bases or ends have the same size and shape and are parallel to one another, and each of whose sides is a parallelogram.
2. A transparent body of this form, often of glass and usually with triangular ends, used for separating white light passed through it into a spectrum or for reflecting beams of light.
3. A cut-glass object, such as a pendant of a chandelier.
4. A crystal form consisting of three or more similar faces parallel to a single axis.
5. A medium that misrepresents whatever is seen through it.

[Late Latin prīsma, from Greek prīsma, thing sawed off, prism, from prīzein, to saw, variant of prīein.]

prism

(ˈprɪzəm)
n
1. (General Physics) a transparent polygonal solid, often having triangular ends and rectangular sides, for dispersing light into a spectrum or for reflecting and deviating light. They are used in spectroscopes, binoculars, periscopes, etc
2. (General Physics) a form of crystal with faces parallel to the vertical axis
3. (Mathematics) maths a polyhedron having parallel, polygonal, and congruent bases and sides that are parallelograms
[C16: from Medieval Latin prisma, from Greek: something shaped by sawing, from prizein to saw]

prism

(ˈprɪz əm)

n.
1. Optics. a transparent solid body, often having triangular bases, used for dispersing light into a spectrum or for reflecting rays of light.
2. Geom. a solid having bases or ends that are parallel, congruent polygons and sides that are parallelograms.
3. Crystall. a form having faces parallel to the vertical axis and intersecting the horizontal axes.
[1560–70; < Late Latin prīsma < Greek prîsma literally, something sawed, akin to prizein to saw, prístēs sawyer]

prism

(prĭz′əm)
1. A geometric solid whose bases are congruent polygons lying in parallel planes and whose sides are parallelograms.
2. A solid of this type, often made of glass with triangular ends, used to disperse light and break it up into a spectrum.

prism

A transparent, solid object, with at least two plane faces, that bends a light beam and splits it into its component colors.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.prism - a polyhedron with two congruent and parallel faces (the bases) and whose lateral faces are parallelogramsprism - a polyhedron with two congruent and parallel faces (the bases) and whose lateral faces are parallelograms
polyhedron - a solid figure bounded by plane polygons or faces
parallelepiped, parallelepipedon, parallelopiped, parallelopipedon - a prism whose bases are parallelograms
quadrangular prism - a prism whose bases are quadrangles
triangular prism - a prism whose bases are triangles
2.prism - optical device having a triangular shape and made of glass or quartzprism - optical device having a triangular shape and made of glass or quartz; used to deviate a beam or invert an image
biprism - an optical device for obtaining interference fringes
erecting prism - a right-angled optical prism used to turn an inverted image upright
optical device - a device for producing or controlling light
prism spectroscope, spectroscope - an optical instrument for spectrographic analysis
telescope, scope - a magnifier of images of distant objects
Translations
مَنشورمَوْشور
hranolprizma
prisme
prisma, strendingurstrendingur
prizmėprizminis
prizma
graniastosłuppryzmat
hranolprizma

prism

[ˈprɪzəm] N (Geom, Tech) → prisma m

prism

[ˈprɪzəm] nprisme m

prism

nPrisma nt

prism

[ˈprɪzm] n (Geom, Tech) → prisma m

prism

(ˈprizm) noun
1. a solid figure whose sides are parallel and whose two ends are the same in shape and size.
2. a glass object of this shape, usually with triangular ends, which breaks up a beam of white light into the colours of the rainbow.
prisˈmatic (-ˈma-) adjective
References in classic literature ?
Well, from my remembrance of your aunt, Miss Pollyanna, I must say I think it would take something more than a few prisms in the sunlight to--to make her bang many doors--for gladness.
41421 (or at some lesser distance), from the centres of the six surrounding spheres in the same layer; and at the same distance from the centres of the adjoining spheres in the other and parallel layer; then, if planes of intersection between the several spheres in both layers be formed, there will result a double layer of hexagonal prisms united together by pyramidal bases formed of three rhombs; and the rhombs and the sides of the hexagonal prisms will have every angle identically the same with the best measurements which have been made of the cells of the hive-bee.
So in Nicolete's bower it illuminated with strange radiancy the dainty disorder of deserted lunch, made prisms out of the wine-glasses, painted the white cloth with wedge-shaped rainbows, and flooded the cavernous interiors of the half-eaten fowl with a pathetic yellow torchlight.
I take the liberty of differing from Madame Prunes and Prisms, and, as your physician, I order you to run.
Papa, potatoes, poultry, prunes, and prism are all very good words for the lips: especially prunes and prism.
In the atmosphere of the Easterly weather, as pellucid as a piece of crystal and refracting like a prism, we could see the appalling numbers of our helpless company, even to those who in more normal conditions would have remained invisible, sails down under the horizon.
His face and eyes were as beautiful as ever, and his fancy was still like a prism, separating everything that fell upon it into rainbows.
It was then ten in the morning; the rays of the sun struck the surface of the waves at rather an oblique angle, and at the touch of their light, decomposed by refraction as through a prism, flowers, rocks, plants, shells, and polypi were shaded at the edges by the seven solar colours.
Of course I submitted to him, because it was my duty; it was my feeling for him," said Dorothea, looking through the prism of her tears.
He wore but a single article of clothing or adornment, a small collar of gold from which depended upon his chest a great ornament as large as a dinner plate set solid with huge diamonds, except for the exact center which was occupied by a strange stone, an inch in diameter, that scintillated nine different and distinct rays; the seven colors of our earthly prism and two beautiful rays which, to me, were new and nameless.
His name and his bright past, seen through the prism of whispered gossip, had gained him the nickname of THE ADMIRAL.
The mammoth grand-stand was clothed in flags, streamers, and rich tapestries, and packed with several acres of small-fry tributary kings, their suites, and the British aristocracy; with our own royal gang in the chief place, and each and every individual a flashing prism of gaudy silks and velvets -- well, I never saw anything to begin with it but a fight between an Upper Mississippi sunset and the aurora borealis.