PTSD


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PTSD

abbr.
posttraumatic stress disorder

PTSD

abbreviation for
(Psychiatry) post-traumatic stress disorder

PTSD

posttraumatic stress disorder.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.PTSD - an anxiety disorder associated with serious traumatic events and characterized by such symptoms as survivor guilt, reliving the trauma in dreams, numbness and lack of involvement with reality, or recurrent thoughts and images
survivor guilt - a deep feeling of guilt often experienced by those who have survived some catastrophe that took the lives of many others; derives in part from a feeling that they did not do enough to save the others who perished and in part from feelings of being unworthy relative to those who died; "survivor guilt was first noted in those who survived the Holocaust"
anxiety disorder - a cover term for a variety of mental disorders in which severe anxiety is a salient symptom
battle fatigue, combat fatigue, combat neurosis, shell shock - a mental disorder caused by stress of active warfare
Translations

PTSD

[ˌpiːtiːɛsˈdiː] abbr (=post-traumatic stress disorder)PT teacher nprofesseur mf de sport

PTSD

abbr post-traumatic stress disorder. V. disorder.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, PTSD can also occur after traumatic events experienced by any of us - including physical or sexual assault, being involved in a serious car accident or traumatic childbirth.
When the participants listened to random bursts of white noise, those who were diagnosed with PTSD had more frequent eye blinks, and increased heart rate, skin conductance and pupil area responses indicators of the bodys autonomic response than participants without PTSD.
Jeste and colleagues conducted a comprehensive review of published empirical studies relevant to early ageing in PTSD, covering multiple databases going back to the year 2000, Medical Xpress reported.
1) In brief, the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) defines PTSD as persistent and long-term changes in thoughts or mood following actual or threatened exposure to death, serious injury, or sexual assault that leads to re-experiencing, functional impairment, physiologic stress reactions, and avoidance of thoughts or situations associated with the original trauma.
This part of Culture and PTSD provides a strong foundational knowledge for the reader on the history of PTSD as a diagnosis and, perhaps more importantly, the debates surrounding the concept of PTSD among the professional community.
To learn more about PTSD, visit the National Center for PTSD website at www.
For example, if you were directly exposed to the trauma or injured, you are more likely to develop PTSD.
Maybe, in future editions of the DSM, we should think of this as a subtype of PTSD or potentially as a new diagnostic category, although it's far too early to make any conclusions about that," Dr.
5) Most PTSD patients with comorbid SUD receive treatment only for SUD and the PTSD symptoms often are unaddressed.
Ride for PTSD is author Greg Smith's PTSD awareness and fund raising project.
Although epidemiological studies have reported the lifetime prevalence of PTSD to range from 4.
Neuroscientist Rachel Yehuda, PhD, and colleagues began investigating the effect of parental PTSD on offspring in the late 1990s.