pacifism

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pac·i·fism

 (păs′ə-fĭz′əm)
n.
1. The belief that disputes between nations can and should be settled peacefully.
2.
a. Opposition to war or violence as a means of resolving disputes.
b. Such opposition demonstrated by refusal to participate in military action.

[French pacifisme, from pacifique, pacific; see pacific.]

pac′i·fist n.
pac′i·fis′tic adj.

pacifism

(ˈpæsɪˌfɪzəm)
n
1. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) the belief that violence of any kind is unjustifiable and that one should not participate in war
2. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) the belief that international disputes can be settled by arbitration rather than war

pac•i•fism

(ˈpæs əˌfɪz əm)

n.
1. opposition to war or violence as a resort in the settlement of disputes.
2. refusal to engage in military activity because of one's principles or beliefs.
3. nonresistance.
[1905–10; < French pacifisme]
pac′i•fist, n., adj.
pac`i•fis′tic, adj.

pacifism

1. an opposition to war or violence of any kind.
2. the principle or policy of establishing and maintaining universal peace.
3. nonresistance to aggression. Cf. bellicism.pacifist, n.pacifistic, adj.
See also: War
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.pacifism - the doctrine that all violence is unjustifiable
doctrine, ism, philosophical system, philosophy, school of thought - a belief (or system of beliefs) accepted as authoritative by some group or school
2.pacifism - the belief that all international disputes can be settled by arbitration
belief - any cognitive content held as true

pacifism

noun peacemaking, non-violence, satyagraha, passive resistance His work is inspired by ideals of pacifism.
Translations
مُسالمه، مَذْهب السّلام
pacifismus
pacifisme
pacifizmus
friîarstefna
pacifizmus
barışseverliksavaş aleyhtarlığı

pacifism

[ˈpæsɪfɪzəm] Npacifismo m

pacifism

[ˈpæsɪfɪzəm] npacifisme f

pacifism

nPazifismus m

pacifism

[ˈpæsɪˌfɪzm] npacifismo

pacify

(ˈpӕsifai) verb
to make calm or peaceful. She tried to pacify the quarrelling children.
ˌpacifiˈcation (-fi-) noun
ˈpacifism noun
the belief that all war is wrong and that one must not take part in it.
ˈpacifist noun
a person who believes in pacifism. As a pacifist he refused to fight in the war.
References in periodicals archive ?
In fact, pacifists are about the bravest people around, putting themselves on the line to campaign for peace.
We Answered With Love" is based on the letters of these two thoughtful young people, giving a personal perspective on the role of pacifists during the Great War and, at the same time, revealing a delightful, romantic story of friendship turning to love.
It should be enough to note that a single sociopath, armed with nothing more than a knife, could exterminate a city full of pacifists.
Wills' answer couldn't have been more pleasing, at least to a few of us who persist in seeing Christ as a teacher of nonviolence: "All Christians should be pacifists.
And one of Wales' most influential pacifists during the first half of the 20th century, George Davies, was born in Liverpool.
FURTHER to my letter printed in the Daily Post on April 6, I am moved to write again regarding the conviction of Christian pacifists that war is evil and contrary to Christ's teaching, by quoting from the 1943 Bryce Memorial Lecture delivered by the much respected Professor Gilbert Murray:-"Whatever the original, or alleged original, cause of any war, it settles down in time to the mere pursuit of what Thucydides calls 'arche; (mastery); the mere question of 'we' or 'they'.
It was enough to make even the most devoted pacifists rethink their ideals.
Pacifists are often mis-described as "sons of God," an allusion to Our Lord's sermon when he said "Blessed are the peacemakers: for they shall be called children of God" (Matt 5:9).
So, in the plain sense of the word, Mennonites were no longer pacifists even though their tradition was nonresistant.
In the words of an Italian newspaper, "Israeli pacifists risk at the most coming late to their Tel Aviv cafe.
Then he turns to actual cases, starting with religious pacifists during the French and Indian War 1754-63.
She explains how pacifists associated in such groups as the Fellowship of Reconciliation imitated exemplary "heroes" from Jesus to Gandhi and told themselves stories about soldiers making friends across enemy lines and women offering breakfast to armed intruders.