pack rat

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pack rat

n.
1. Any of various small rodents of the genus Neotoma of North and Central America that collect in or around their nests a great variety of small objects. Also called trade rat, woodrat.
2. Western US A petty thief.
3. Informal A collector or accumulator of miscellaneous objects.

pack rat

n
(Animals) any rat of the genus Neotoma, of W North America, having a long tail that is furry in some species: family Cricetidae. Also called: woodrat

pack′ rat`


n.
1. any North and Central American rat of the genus Neotoma, noted for carrying off shiny articles to its nest.
2. Informal. a person who collects, saves, or hoards useless small items.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.pack rat - someone who collects things that have been discarded by otherspack rat - someone who collects things that have been discarded by others
hoarder - a person who accumulates things and hides them away for future use
2.pack rat - any of several bushy-tailed rodents of the genus Neotoma of western North Americapack rat - any of several bushy-tailed rodents of the genus Neotoma of western North America; hoards food and other objects
wood rat, wood-rat - any of various small short-tailed rodents of the northern hemisphere having soft fur grey above and white below with furred tails and large ears; some are hosts for Ixodes pacificus and Ixodes scapularis (Lyme disease ticks)
dusky-footed woodrat, Neotoma fuscipes - host to Lyme disease tick (Ixodes pacificus) in northern California
References in periodicals archive ?
Betancourt notes, however, that the data from pack rat middens are "messy and subject to large uncertainties" because radiocarbon techniques can pinpoint a date only to within roughly 100 years.
Of course, the more sources that are used for forest history--such as needle types in fossilized pack rat middens and fire scar frequency in old stumps--the more accurate it becomes.
Also, researchers constantly struggle with a clear reference, but in certain regions they have been able to develop a historical range of variability, as Botkin suggested, from photos, written records, preserved areas, fire scars, pack rat middens, lake bed pollen, and other sources.