nociceptor

(redirected from Pain fibers)
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no·ci·cep·tor

 (nō′sĭ-sĕp′tər)
n.
A sensory receptor that responds to pain.

[Latin nocēre, to hurt; see nocent + (re)ceptor.]
References in periodicals archive ?
People with asthma have a lot more pain fibers and they're especially sensitive.
of Harvard Medical School will study how pain fibers drive the production of interleukin-23 (IL-23), a protein linked to inflammation, to find new therapies for psoriasis inflammation.
now, an Australian study published in the journal Pain suggests how peppermint activates an "anti-pain" channel in the c The researchers state that there appears to be a definite link between IBS and a former bout of gastroenteritis, which leaves nerve pain fibers in a heightened state, altering mechanisms in the gut wall and resulting in ongoing pain.
They have been described as coagulation of the neo-nociceptive pain fibers, repair of annular tears and remodelling and shrinkage of the annular collagen (8,10).
The new study is another piece of evidence in a long trail of research that affirms what careful anatomical studies have already revealed: that the ascending pain fibers reach the cortex by 20 weeks, if not earlier.
N-type calcium channels are located mainly in the dorsal horn cells of the spinal cord, predominantly on the superficial layers, in the area of substantia gelatinosa where pain fibers synapse, Dr.
There are several reasons for this increased sensitivity: (a) the number of nociceptive nerve fibers in the skin of the neonate is similar to and possibly even greater than the number found in the adult; (b) incomplete myelination of pain fibers in the preterm infant does not hinder pain transmission, and the shorter distances of the immature pain pathways offset any slowing of velocity that may be caused by lack of myelination; (c) pain neurotransmitters are found in abundance and are functional in the fetus; and (d) there are large receptive fields of neurons in the somatosensory cortex (Anand, 1998; Anand, Phil, & Carr, 1989; Perreault, et al.
They are thought to occur when pain fibers in the head release chemicals that cause blood vessels to expand.