palaeobotany

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palaeobotany

(ˌpælɪəʊˈbɒtənɪ)
n
(Palaeontology) the study of fossil plants
palaeobotanical, ˌpalaeoboˈtanic adj
ˌpalaeoˈbotanist n

paleobotany, palaeobotany

the branch of paleology that studies fossil plants, especially their origin, structure, and growth. — paleobotanist, palaeobotanist, n.paleobotanic, palaeobotanic, paleobotanical, palaeobotanical, adj.
See also: Fossils
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.palaeobotany - the study of fossil plantspalaeobotany - the study of fossil plants    
phytology, botany - the branch of biology that studies plants
palaeodendrology, paleodendrology - the branch of paleobotany that studies fossil trees
palaeobiology, paleobiology - a branch of paleontology that deals with the origin and growth and structure of fossil animals and plants as living organisms
References in periodicals archive ?
About the scientific excavation line with scientific assistants, the position of documentation Assisten, palaeobotanist (macroremains and pollen), and a restorer GeoarchEnologen (for Erstversorgug) by the contractor is given.
In 1916, however, the name of Estonian oil shale acquired a new scientific content when inspired by the organic component found in it and identified as sapropel (a kind of kerogen) the Russian palaeobotanist Mikhail Zalesskiy renamed it kukersite [8].
She studied and lectured in Australia, Antarctica, Nigeria and The Seychelles and was a prolific author and illustrator of Natural History books | Professor Dianne Edwards, 72, is a palaeobotanist and distinguished Research Professor at Cardiff University.
Trailblazers will include women such as Marie Stopes (1880-1958), a palaeobotanist, pioneer and advocate of birth control and Dorothy Hodgkin (1910-1994) who won a Nobel Prize in 1964 for her work in mapping the structure of penicillin and deciphering the structure of insulin.
Tees Valley RIGS will use the money to tell the story of Marske sandstone quarry and the fossils found by palaeobotanist HH Thomas and others in the early 1900s.
Marie Stopes, a palaeobotanist and advocate of birth control, and Dorothy Hodgkin, who won a Noble prize in 1964 for her work in mapping the structure of insulin.