Palagi

(redirected from Palangi)

Palagi

(pɑːˈlʌŋiː)
n, pl -gi
(Peoples) NZ a Samoan name for European
[from Samoan papālagi]
References in periodicals archive ?
Those islanders are known as fie palangi, wanna-be-whites.
As Palangi notes in a radio interview, it's difficult to film women in Afghanistan as traditionally they're not meant to be in front of the screen.
Directed by Amin Palangi, a student of Fiske's from where she taught at the Australian Film Television and Radio School, the documentary will resonate well with an audience, she says.
Both the first and second authors are Tokelauan and the last author is Palangi (European ancestry).
Importantly, the Palangi and Maori staff members were participating within the movement and not waiting for it to happen and trying to be part of the project when it became well known.
SAVINGS IN KL Travelbag is offering eleven nights in Kuala Lumpur and Langkawi from pounds 845pp, including return flights with Malaysia Airlines between London Heathrow and Langkawi, via KL on the inbound flight, one night at the Pan Pacific Hotel in KL and ten nights at the five-star Palangi Beach Resort in Langkawi on a room only basis.
Tavita De Seymour, one of seven men on the programme, said he applied for the course because he thought it would equip him with the skills to work with Pacific and other communities, and help him, of Samoan and palangi descent, connect with his Pacific heritage.
Recently a Funafutian married a palangi (white) woman, and his reports on the novelty of my kind are apparently piquing some interest.
Whether haole in Hawaii, palangi in Samoa, or are in the Marquesas, most of the (surfing, scuba diving, literary professing) whites Farber encounters share the yearning "to establish oneself as special outsider," the one who understands and is accepted.
One of the boys believes that he knows what palangi (the West) is like because he watches these tourists and because he has a movie poster.
The dilemma posed by a relativistic stance toward the treatment of children is not simply academic; increasingly, it must be confronted by members of both Islander and palangi (Western) communities.