palimpsest

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pal·imp·sest

 (păl′ĭmp-sĕst′)
n.
1. A manuscript, typically of papyrus or parchment, that has been written on more than once, with the earlier writing incompletely scraped off or erased and often legible.
2. An object or area that has extensive evidence of or layers showing activity or use: "My skin had become a palimpsest of fleeting sensations, and each layer bore the imprint of who I was" (Paul Auster).

[Latin palimpsēstum, from Greek palimpsēston, neuter of palimpsēstos, scraped again : palin, again; see kwel- in Indo-European roots + psēn, to scrape.]

palimpsest

(ˈpælɪmpˌsɛst)
n
(Printing, Lithography & Bookbinding) a manuscript on which two or more successive texts have been written, each one being erased to make room for the next
adj
1. (Printing, Lithography & Bookbinding) (of a text) written on a palimpsest
2. (Printing, Lithography & Bookbinding) (of a document) used as a palimpsest
[C17: from Latin palimpsestus parchment cleaned for reuse, from Greek palimpsēstos, from palin again + psēstos rubbed smooth, from psēn to scrape]

pal•imp•sest

(ˈpæl ɪmpˌsɛst)

n.
a parchment or the like from which writing has been partially or completely erased to make room for another text.
[1655–65; < Latin palimpsēstus < Greek palímpsēstos rubbed again =pálin again + psēstós scraped, rubbed, v. adj. of psân to rub smooth]
pal`imp•ses′tic, adj.

palimpsest

- Can describe a manuscript or writing surface that has been reused, erased, or altered while retaining traces of its earlier form—and, by extension, an object, place, or area that reflects its history.
See also related terms for manuscript.

palimpsest

a parchment from which earlier writing has been partially or completely removed by scraping so that it may be used again. — palimpsestic, adj.
See also: Manuscripts
a piece of parchment or vellum from which earlier writing has been erased or scraped off to allow for reuse. — palimpsestic, adj.
See also: Books
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.palimpsest - a manuscript (usually written on papyrus or parchment) on which more than one text has been written with the earlier writing incompletely erased and still visible
holograph, manuscript - handwritten book or document
Translations
palimpsest
palimpsest
palimpszeszt
palimpsestus
palimpsest
palimpsest
palimpsest

palimpsest

[ˈpælɪmpsest] Npalimpsesto m

palimpsest

nPalimpsest m
References in classic literature ?
I scanned a leaf particu- larly and saw that it was a palimpsest.
Beloved by one, a sort of instinctive and savage half-man, for its beauty, for its stature, for the harmonies which emanated from its magnificent ensemble; beloved by the other, a learned and passionate imagination, for its myth, for the sense which it contains, for the symbolism scattered beneath the sculptures of its front,--like the first text underneath the second in a palimpsest,--in a word, for the enigma which it is eternally propounding to the understanding.
Holmes and I sat together in silence all the evening, he engaged with a powerful lens deciphering the remains of the original inscription upon a palimpsest, I deep in a recent treatise upon surgery.
Well, Watson, it's as well we have not to turn out to-night," said Holmes, laying aside his lens and rolling up the palimpsest.
It will be harder to read now than that palimpsest.
His mirror of vision was silver-clear, a flashing, dazzling palimpsest of imagery.
Palimpsests of power and contestation have been inscribed on the body politic of the state where issues of language spark agitations putting parents, youth and educationists on the warpath.
Paul, where palimpsests are most representative of the sequence of events in Maltese history.
Of special note are the sections dedicated to his palimpsests and self-portraits.
He is the author of two books, "Antiphon for the Feast of a Virgin Not a Martyr," and "Potsherds and Palimpsests," both with illustrations by famed illustrator Howard Besnia.
Buckingham's alignments of story and image, whether anchored in dry historical fact or conjured from evocative fragments, are palimpsests that instruct and entertain, expanding viewers' sense of identity.
The palimpsests which Gabolde scrutinized reveal the names of Hatshepsut and Thutmose III in place of that of Thutmose II.