pandemic

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pan·dem·ic

 (păn-dĕm′ĭk)
adj.
1. Widespread; general.
2. Medicine Epidemic over a wide geographic area and affecting a large proportion of the population: pandemic influenza.
n.
A pandemic disease.

[From Late Latin pandēmus, from Greek pandēmos, of all the people : pan-, pan- + dēmos, people; see dā- in Indo-European roots.]

pandemic

(pænˈdɛmɪk)
adj
(Pathology) (of a disease) affecting persons over a wide geographical area; extensively epidemic
n
(Pathology) a pandemic disease
[C17: from Late Latin pandēmus, from Greek pandēmos general, from pan- + demos the people]

pan•dem•ic

(pænˈdɛm ɪk)

adj.
1. (of a disease) prevalent throughout an entire country, continent, or the whole world; epidemic over a large area.
n.
2. a pandemic disease.
[1660–70; < Late Latin pandēm(us) (< Greek pándēmos common, public =pan- pan- + -démos, adj. derivative of démos people) + -ic]

pan·dem·ic

(păn-dĕm′ĭk)
An epidemic that spreads over a very wide area, such as a whole country or continent.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.pandemic - an epidemic that is geographically widespread; occurring throughout a region or even throughout the world
epidemic - a widespread outbreak of an infectious disease; many people are infected at the same time
Adj.1.pandemic - epidemic over a wide geographical area; "a pandemic outbreak of malaria"
epidemic - (especially of medicine) of disease or anything resembling a disease; attacking or affecting many individuals in a community or a population simultaneously; "an epidemic outbreak of influenza"
2.pandemic - existing everywhere; "pandemic fear of nuclear war"
general - applying to all or most members of a category or group; "the general public"; "general assistance"; "a general rule"; "in general terms"; "comprehensible to the general reader"

pandemic

adjective
So pervasive and all-inclusive as to exist in or affect the whole world:
Translations
Pandemiepandemisch
pandemia
heimsfaraldur
pandemijapandeminis
pandemie
pandemipandemisk
pandemia
pandemipandemisk

pandemic

[pænˈdemɪk]
A. ADJpandémico
B. Npandemia f

pandemic

[pænˈdɛmɪk] n [disease] → pandémie f

pandemic

nPandemie f (geh)
adjpandemisch; pandemic diseaseSeuche f

pandemic

[pænˈdɛmɪk]
1. n (frm) (Med) → pandemia
2. adj (Med) → pandemico/a

pan·dem·ic

a. pandémico-a, de contagiosidad epidémica en un área geográfica extensa.

pandemic

n pandemia
References in periodicals archive ?
At this writing, there are no current pandemics, according to August Pabst, a spokesperson for USAID, a Washington, DC-based federal agency helping to stabilize countries by investing in agriculture, health systems and democratic institutions.
More recent pandemics include the HIV pandemic and 2009 H1N1 pandemic.
However, it is noted that the pandemics of 1957 and 1968 did not arise from highly pathogenic influenza viruses, and the next pandemic may well arise from a low-pathogenicity virus.
Pandemics represent a systemic exposure; systemic exposures create significant challenges regarding aggregate loss projection and management.
In response to the earlier emergence of SARS and the H5N1 avian flu and the panic they caused, most Western countries had taken steps to set up contingency plans to prepare for possible future outbreaks of other deadly pandemics.
One of the fundamental lessons learned from the past is that pandemics occur in waves.
There is seemingly no pattern to the cycle of pandemics, with intervals between the most recent pandemics varying from around 10 to 40 years.
Now casting and short term forecasting during influenza pandemics.
Influenza pandemics are, thankfully, rare but recurring events.
The most recent pandemics to hit American soil killed more than 600,000 Americans in 1918, 1957 and 1968.
While we can't be certain the H5N1 virus, currently a disease of birds in Asia, Europe and Africa, will spark a pandemic, we can be sure that pandemics will happen.
The tool, called the Pandemic Severity Index (PSI), takes into account the fact that the amount of harm caused by pandemics can vary greatly, with that variability having an impact on recommended actions for public health departments, schools, and businesses.