Pangloss


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Related to Pangloss: Panglossian, Candide

Pangloss

(ˈpænɡlɒs)
n
a person who views a situation with unwarranted optimism
[C19: after Dr Pangloss, a character in Voltaire's Candide (1759)]
Panˈglossian adj
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Noun1.Pangloss - an incurable optimist in a satire by Voltaire
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References in classic literature ?
This world was not then so good as Doctor Pangloss believed it, neither was it so wicked as Dantes thought it, since this man, who had nothing to expect from his comrade but the inheritance of his share of the prize-money, manifested so much sorrow when he saw him fall.
Pangloss for himself; and very earnestly, but very unsuccessfully, trying to persuade the others that there were some fine tragic parts in the rest of the dramatis personae.
The chapter includes interesting contrastive analysis of the presentation of explanations by Pangloss and by the narrator, showing how the latter guides the reader to a perception of ~good narrative' as that which ~develops in terms of an everyday practical logic and makes rooms for contradictions that formal logic cannot accommodate' (64).
Like Pangloss, Candide's tutor, Whipple is ever-optimistic: "We live in a nation where all men are created equal until proven otherwise," he tells Lester early on.
Pangloss that we are in the best of all possible worlds.
and Miss for Trollope and Martineau and by his use (not Dickens's) of phrases such as "[t]he lady commentators" (92), "a lady Pangloss like Miss Martineau" (106), "the lady reformer" (110), "facile meliorists like Miss Martineau" who exist in a "daydream of life" (118), and so on.
This most popular of Voltaire's works is a masterful satire on the follies and vices of men, particularly of the belief embodied by Pangloss that "All is for the best in this best of all possible worlds.
Thereafter, he, Cun egonde, and Pangloss embark -- sometimes singly, sometimes together -- on a long series of disastrous adventures.
After 100,000 people were killed in the 1755 Lisbon earthquake, he wrote Candide, the story of a young aristocrat and his professor Pangloss, who set off around the world determined to prove - as natural disaster and human cruelty escalates - that "everything is for the best".
Pangloss and Don Issachar, was a very good speaking actor and a commanding singer.
Clearly no student of Professor Pangloss, David Malone takes no prisoners in detailing the individual and collective failings of the members of the United Nations Security Council to find a consensual and credible way to overcome Saddam Hussein's ceaseless splitting tactics.
Voltaire expert Haydn Mason argues that almost everyone in the tale is basically malevolent, "gratuitously murderous or deceitful" (10)--including Pangloss.