Pantagruelism


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Pantagruelism

the habit of dealing with serious matters in a spirit of good and sometimes cynical good humor. [Allusion to Rabelais’ satirical novels Gargantua (1534) and Pantagruel (1532), especially to the behavior of Pantagruel, Gargantua’s huge son.] — Pantagruelian, adj.
See also: Humor
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References in periodicals archive ?
Despite Miro's inspired Catalan Pantagruelism, the formalist predispositions of this show's curator, Anne Umland, reveal that the seemingly capricious artistic strategies that Miro adopted (and equally suddenly departed from) between 1927 and 1937 were as dispassionately Cartesian as any of Duchamp's arcane gestures.
Among other claims, Geonget proposes that Pantagruelism is more Christian than Stoic (disagreeing with Screech), and based on epikeia (equity); that the name Bacbuc in the Fifth Book includes the syllable buc, which means perplexity in Hebrew, and should be related to the witch Baboue; that agilles is a key word for Evangelicals and for Rabelais; and that we are intended to see the Abbey of Thelema as the Heavenly Jerusalem, and in a sense as the center of the world.
Duval, "The Judge Bridoye, Pantagruelism, and the unity of Rabelais's Tiers Livre", ER XVII (1983), 41-42, ainsi que son Design of Rabelais's Tiers Livre, 147-50.