pantheism

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pan·the·ism

 (păn′thē-ĭz′əm)
n.
1. A doctrine identifying the Deity with the universe and its phenomena.
2. Belief in and worship of all gods.

pan′the·ist n.
pan′the·is′tic, pan′the·is′ti·cal adj.
pan′the·is′ti·cal·ly adv.

pantheism

(ˈpænθɪˌɪzəm)
n
1. (Theology) the doctrine that God is the transcendent reality of which man, nature, and the material universe are manifestations
2. (Theology) any doctrine that regards God as identical with the material universe or the forces of nature
3. (Theology) readiness to worship all or a large number of gods
ˈpantheist n
ˌpantheˈistic, ˌpantheˈistical adj
ˌpantheˈistically adv

pan•the•ism

(ˈpæn θiˌɪz əm)

n.
1. the doctrine that God is the transcendent reality of which the material world and humanity are only manifestations.
2. any religious belief or philosophical doctrine that identifies God with the universe.
[1725–35; < French panthéisme]
pan′the•ist, n.
pan`the•is′tic, pan`the•is′ti•cal, adj.
pan`the•is′ti•cal•ly, adv.

pantheism

1. the belief that identifies God with the universe.
2. the belief that God is the only reality, transcending all, and that the universe and everything in it are mere manifestations of Him. — pantheist, n., adj.pantheistic, adj.
See also: Religion
the identification of God with the universe as His manifestation. — pantheist, n.
See also: God and Gods
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.pantheism - (rare) worship that admits or tolerates all gods
theism - the doctrine or belief in the existence of a God or gods
2.pantheism - the doctrine or belief that God is the universe and its phenomena (taken or conceived of as a whole) or the doctrine that regards the universe as a manifestation of God
theism - the doctrine or belief in the existence of a God or gods
Translations
panteismus
panteisme
panteismo
panteismi
panteizam
algyðistrú
panteisme
panteizm
panteism
panteizmus
panteism
panteizm
泛神論

pantheism

[ˈpænθiːɪzəm] Npanteísmo m

pantheism

[ˈpænθiɪzəm] npanthéisme m

pantheism

nPantheismus m

pantheism

[ˈpænθɪˌɪzm] npanteismo
References in periodicals archive ?
17) In attempting to discern between the persons of Weston and the Bent Eldil possessing him, Ransom reflects, "There was no doubt a confusion of persons in damnation: what Pantheists falsely hoped of Heaven bad men really received in Hell.
Christians in the Roman Empire turned such laws passed by Roman pantheists against them.
The census revealed other religious affiliations: 16,849 were pagans, 8413 were Wiccan witches,1046 were druids, 1395 pantheists, 2542 Zoroastrians, 2921 follow Jainism, 2161 Scientologists, 1485 into theosophy and 1391 were Rastafarian.
3) A few notable exceptions include Ahisma-following Hindus and Buddists, Vegans, pantheists, certain animists, and strict animal liberationists.
However, I excuse Doty because he has established that God is actively interested in the material world, which defies materialists, deists, and the understandings of all Eastern religions and pantheists.
Its inter-sectarian appeal is broad, and it has been propounded by Greek pagans, Muslims, Jews, Christians, both Catholic and Protestant, and even pantheists.
17) Margaret Jacob, The Radical Enlightenment: Pantheists, Freemasons and Republicans, second revised edition (Lafayette, LA: Cornerstone Books 2006).
He could cast diatribes at pantheists and pantheism but still maintain his "one system of God," with natural and supernatural its "necessary phases.
Pantheists and other primitive religious groups blame God for everything, too: it's easy to do when God is everything and everything is God.
Though our literature and nation have produced great pantheists, in the generative outpourings of Emerson, John Muir, Thoreau, Dickinson, Whitman, and in the relatively recent publication of Native American literature, when Ronald Reagan said if you've seen one redwood tree you've seen them all, he was only expressing another form of American naturalism which, borrowing from the early churches, produced a citizenry and a literature enmeshed in the throes of pre-determination, which our commitment to the physical and spiritual laws of manifest destiny made sovereign.
As Deneen observes, Berry believes that "humans cannot be the conscious 'animals' of the pantheists any more than they can be the self-sufficient 'gods' suggested by those who would establish human dominion over nature.