papalist


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Related to papalist: papacy

papalist

(ˈpeɪpəlɪst)
n
(Roman Catholic Church) a follower of the Pope or papacy
Translations
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Thus] the papalist axiom that the divine law can be kept and observed fully and perfectly by the regenerate in this life.
One of our friends, Marcello Moretti, a keen Catholic and zealous papalist, at times when it was unwise to talk, used to attract our attention by making a sign in the air with his hands outlining a papal tiara and then crossing his arms to signify the crossed keys beneath it.
For although it is perhaps not able to approve the monstrosities of Tetzel, about which we have spoken, it yet either does not want or does not dare to condemn them, because they had at that time, as we have shown, been defended by the whole papalist church and confirmed by papal authority.
arguing in the teeth of the high papalist constitutive narrative
If they developed a new view of the founding of the city, they retained the notion that Florence, as the daughter of Rome, had a special heritage; and if they no longer saw Florence as the dutiful servant of Papalist Guelfism, they incorporated into their new view of the city as the champion of republican liberty certain features of the old Guelf ideology -- its moralism and its sense of special civic destiny.
Evidence of the earlier voices that Dante had heard in conversations and sermons in Florence, especially at the Franciscan school of Santa Croce and the Dominican studium of Santa Maria Novella, would further contend against the idea of a later scribal intrusion, either neutral or papalist.
In fact, Voltairian animus against the Church is so deep-seated among the faculty at contemporary mainline universities that last year one embattled papalist, trapped in a U.
Since the Visconti belonged to the Ghibelline or pro-imperial party--as opposed to their Guelph or papalist rivals, the Della Torre--the Guglielmite trial took place in a climate of marked hostility between the inquisitors and the ruling family.
Often placed among the Libertines, Coornhert considered himself a Catholic, not a Papalist.
In this context it became clear to him that the papalist solutions being advocated by some other ecclesiologists would be inadequate formulations to serve the unity of the church and East-West reconciliation.
He reasons that the conciliar definitions of papal primacy and infallibility by Vatican I in 1869 "left the Church with an extremely papalist tilt" (295).