parenthetical

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Related to Parentheticals: gruelling, derisory, pending, mistaken, stocky

par·en·thet·i·cal

 (păr′ən-thĕt′ĭ-kəl)
adj. also par·en·thet·ic (-ĭk)
1. Set off within or as if within parentheses; qualifying or explanatory: a parenthetical remark.
2. Using or containing parentheses.
n.
A parenthetical word, phrase, or remark.

par′en·thet′i·cal·ly adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.parenthetical - an expression in parenthesesparenthetical - an expression in parentheses; "his writing was full of parentheticals"
adjunct - a construction that can be used to extend the meaning of a word or phrase but is not one of the main constituents of a sentence
Adj.1.parenthetical - qualifying or explaining; placed or as if placed in parentheses; "parenthetical remarks"
incidental, incident - (sometimes followed by `to') minor or casual or subordinate in significance or nature or occurring as a chance concomitant or consequence; "incidental expenses"; "the road will bring other incidental advantages"; "extra duties incidental to the job"; "labor problems incidental to a rapid expansion"; "confusion incidental to a quick change"

parenthetical

parenthetic
adjective interposed, incidental, explanatory, qualifying, inserted, bracketed, extraneous, extrinsic He kept interrupting his story with parenthetical remarks.

parenthetical

adjective
Marked by or given to digression:
Translations
إعْتِراضِيَّه
vsunutý
indskudt
közbevetett
til skÿringar; innan sviga
vsunutý
ara söz ile ilgili

parenthetical

[ˌpærənˈθetɪkəl] ADJentre paréntesis

parenthetical

adjbeiläufig; could I make one parenthetical comment?darf ich eine Bemerkung einflechten?

parenthetical

[ˌpærənˈθɛtɪkl] adj (clause) → parentetico/a; (statement) → fra parentesi

parenthesis

(pəˈrenθəsis) plural paˈrentheses (-siːz) noun
1. a word or group of words within a sentence, which gives a comment etc and usually separates from the rest of the sentence by brackets, dashes etc. I asked John (my friend John Smith) to come and see me.
2. a round bracket used to mark the seperate part of such a sentence.
parenthetical (parənˈθetikəl) adjective
a parenthetical remark.
in parentheses
said, written etc as a parenthesis.
References in classic literature ?
The caution of this gentleman was exhibited in his actions, by the utmost method and punctuality, tinctured with a good deal of timidity; and in his speeches, by a parenthetical style, that frequently left to his auditors a long search after his meaning.
What could the wretched Joe do now, after his disregarded parenthetical interruptions, but stand up to his journeyman, and ask him what he meant by interfering betwixt himself and Mrs.
4-5) by storms which spoil his crops begins: the remaining verses are parenthetical, describing the snake `which bears its young in the spring season'.
He spoke with a studious fidelity to a parenthetical manner, into which every little fact - that is, every detail - fitted with delightful ease.
The reader attuned to the fine physicality of these poems may be frustrated by the abstruse parentheticals that disrupt "The Same River: thirteen variations on Heraclitus"--a feature that occasionally also afflicts the book's last long sequence, "Specific Instances of Silence.
You and I have been out drinking together a few too many times and hang with too many of the same people for most publications to allow me to review your work, at least not without one of those tired full-disclosure parentheticals that fool no one ("Josh and I talked about Saul Bellow, Ulysses, and Sanskrit epic meter one night in Philadelphia at an Eritrean bar-restaurant with green astroturf carpeting
800 lacks is any help with the use of signals, which are critical elements to proper citation; parentheticals, which are extremely helpful to the reader; and short-form citations.
Called supplements or parentheticals, they are not generally assigned a formal treatment, but Liu (U.
When it comes to the combinations of pronoun + verb, often classified as parentheticals or comment clauses, there has been some discussion as to whether their emergence as specific linguistic items should be characterized as grammaticalization or pragmaticalization (Waltereit 2002).
One symptom of this is the similarity of Johnston's style to Zizek's, including what for me are some of the pitfalls of Zizek's style: a proliferation of parentheticals within parentheticals, a tendency toward arguments from authority ("contrary to the common wisdom, this is what Kant really said--and therefore it must be true"), a habit of relying on the appeal of the counterintuitive, and most seriously, unclear organization compounded by a general lack of flags to help the reader understand why this particular passage of Hegel or Lacan is being discussed in detail.
Emphasizing process over product, Pisano has also formally framed images of her work space, filled with unfinished models and reference materials, in three photographs, each titled Conceptual Reconstruction Concerning Form: The Object, followed by different parentheticals concerning experience and comprehension.
Misled by earlier editions of the Bluebook, some student-edited law reviews have developed a horrid practice of omitting definite and indefinite articles from parentheticals as though they were telegraphs or newspaper headlines.