Pareto


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Pareto

(Italian paˈrɛːto)
n
1. (Biography) Vilfredo (vilˈfreːdo). 1848–1923, Italian sociologist and economist. He anticipated Fascist principles of government in his Mind and Society (1916)
2. (Economics) (modifier) denoting a law, mathematical formula, etc, originally used by Pareto to express the frequency distribution of incomes in a society
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Noun1.Pareto - Italian sociologist and economist whose theories influenced the development of fascism in Italy (1848-1923)
References in periodicals archive ?
The concept of pareto superiority plays a central role in ethics, economics, and law.
Pareto Securities, a Nordic investment bank, and its real asset investment manager, Pareto Business Management, have said that they have appointed Thomas Lindstrom to lead the EUR1bn portfolio of real assets managed in Sweden.
He cites three tools used by the most effective managers: the priority matrix, pareto (Vilfredo Pareto, 1848-1923) analysis, and time targets.
Under these lock-up undertakings, the banks have undertaken, with certain reservations and exceptions, towards the company's advisor Pareto Securities AB, during a period commencing on the date of the signing of each respective lock-up undertaking and ending on the earlier of the date, it is finally established that the banks in aggregate hold less than 12% of the total number of shares in the company.
Pareto Securities AB will, in accordance with the VPC plan for conversion of securities, deliver the underlying shares of the Company to the holders of the SDRs entitled to receive such shares.
In this paper, calibrated predictors are used to estimate the performance measures efficiently for the IM process and to allow identification of the approximate Pareto Fronts and Sets as will be illustrated in Applications section.
The sociological theory of politics was more formally developed by Vilfredo Pareto (1848-1923).
Hirose argues that Y is, by Impartiality, equally as good as X, and that Z is, by Pareto, better than Y, and, therefore, Z is better than X--hence the duty to save the greater number.
A 19th century economist named Vilfredo Pareto made a discovery that's easy to understand.
In economic terminology, the term "efficiency" refers to the idea of Pareto optimality, or, alternatively, to other concepts (such as Kaldhor-Hicks efficiency and social welfare maximization) commonly used in policy analyses to overcome the restricted practicability of the Pareto efficiency criterion.
In our benchmark, we consider Pareto optimal investment and premium policies.