Parnassianism


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Related to Parnassianism: New Formalist

Parnassianism

the theories and practice of a school of French poets in the 19th century, especially an emphasis upon art for art’s sake, careful metrics, and the repression of emotive elements. — Parnassian, n., adj.
See also: Literature
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References in periodicals archive ?
Robinson, "A Neglected Phase of the Aesthetic Movement: English Parnassianism," PMLA 68 (1953): pp.
According to Allen Phillips, Machado considered himself the poet who brought to Spain the "better qualities of Parnassianism and Symbolism," suggesting that Machado was not only conscious of these intellectual and literary currents, but was an active contributor to their development on the Iberian Peninsula as well (67).
In "The Symbolist Context of the Siren Motif in Moreau's Painting and Bryusov's Poetry" Gregorian discusses painting, poetry, France, Russia, Symbolism, and Parnassianism.
Under the heading "Recitation and Rebellion: Parnassianism, War, and the Fall of Empire" come poems from Louise Ackermann, Malvina Blanchecotte, Louise Michel, Louisa Siefert, and Nina de Villard.
To use the term Antonio Candido employed in describing the history of Brazilian literature, we should celebrate Parnassianism as the moment when literature was fully constituted as a system.
Surrendering none of his rights as a poet in the process, he found, in a transcended Parnassianism, the self-conscious 'naivete' that is characteristic of his work" (31).
It did so by drawing heavily upon Parnassianism and Symbolism, and by establishing a new crystalline and harmonious Spanish syntax based on restraint and precision, a new language musically elegant and spiritedly metaphorical.