parochialize

parochialize

(pəˈrəʊkɪəˌlaɪz) or

parochialise

vb (tr)
to make or perceive as parochial
References in periodicals archive ?
This particular "spin" toward closure, or belief in a purely self-sufficing humanism, is Taylor's attempt to explain and parochialize "the sensed context in which we develop our beliefs," which "has usually sunk to the level of such an unchallenged framework, something we have trouble often thinking ourselves outside of, even as an imaginative exercise" (Taylor 2007, 549-550).
to parochialize her identity and buttress their smug cosmopolitanism.
Criticism of the excesses of the New Criticism (with its emphasis on symbol-only analysis) came from Northrop Frye who complained in his Anatomy of Criticism that New Criticism had the tendency to parochialize itself from cultural anthropology and other tributaries of evaluation.
Indeed, one of the functions of collective bargaining was to parochialize industrial relations so that trade union attention was focused on local decisions, even though key decisions were taken at a higher level (Kinnie, 1987, p.
Such positions seem to me to parochialize intellectual inquiry, and to reduce rather than foster inter-cultural dialogue and social consciousness.
Yet the underlying matrix is surprisingly similar: in all, racial trespassing raises new perspectives and thus implicitly parochializes the English self.
Every account that parochializes the history of the church suppresses the full truth.