parodic


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Related to parodic: parodist

par·o·dy

 (păr′ə-dē)
n. pl. par·o·dies
1.
a. A literary or artistic work that uses imitation, as of the characteristic style of an author or a work, for comic effect or ridicule.
b. A genre, as in literature, comprising such works.
2. Something so bad as to be equivalent to intentional mockery; a travesty: The trial was a parody of justice.
3. Music The practice of reworking an already established composition, especially the incorporation into the Mass of material borrowed from other works, such as motets or madrigals.
tr.v. par·o·died, par·o·dy·ing, par·o·dies
To make a parody of. See Synonyms at imitate.

[Latin parōdia, from Greek parōidiā : para-, subsidiary to; see para-1 + aoidē, ōidē, song; see wed-2 in the Appendix of Indo-European roots.]

pa·rod′ic (pə-rŏd′ĭk), pa·rod′i·cal (-ĭ-kəl) adj.
par′o·dist n.
par′o·dis′tic adj.

pa•rod•ic

(pəˈrɒd ɪk)

also pa•rod′i•cal, par•o•dis•tic

(ˌpær əˈdɪs tɪk)

adj.
being or resembling a parody.
[1820–30]
Translations

parodic

[pəˈrɒdɪk] ADJparódico
References in periodicals archive ?
Alastair Miles, by contrast, misses the oleaginous side of Don Basilio, the music master, but delights in the parodic deployment of his cavernous bass, more usually heard in Wagner
In the second section, he considers the transmutation of Yiddish drama from the advent of the purim-shpil at the end of the seventeenth century, addressing the adoption of theatre by Judaism despite ritual injunction, the parodic roots of the purim-shpil and its carnivalesque nature, the purim-rabbi, and the achievements of Yiddish theatre, and the various languages.
The absurdities, contradictions, and nonsensicalities in Magdy's oeuvre should be read as part and parcel of an essentially parodic approach.
Wordsworth's Poetic Collections, Supplementary Writing and Parodic Reception.
However, the game's cigarette paper-thin plot and omnipresent parodic tone struggle to retain their charm throughout.
Outside of Europe, Christian Spuck may be best known for his Le Grand Pas de Deux, a witty, parodic gala favorite, but after 11 years as Stuttgart Ballet's resident choreographer, he is ready to step up to the next level.
Jacob, in other words, is a parodic reflection of one of the American novel's favorite types: the young man out to make his fortune.
Parody, translator Krystyna Anna Steiger remarks, is a complex form, and this book, parodic in at least a couple of different ways, bears this out.
Mac Conglinne becomes a parodic Christ figure: he is stripped, scourged, and forced to cut his own passion tree (cesadchrand, 1.
Furthermore, the confluence of modernismo's hyperbolic language and the 'scientific' racism within both Orientalism and Argentine nationalism produces a destabilizing parodic effect.
However, no such uncertainty appears in the onstage parody of Castiglione in the two parts of Marston's Antonio plays: Redmond plausibly contends that the ambivalent English response to the Italian courtesy book tradition, manifest in such parodic stage representations, derived from the simultaneous view of Italy itself as a seat of refined learning and the site of an "emerging hostility towards the excessive influence of the debased nation" (100).
A strange element is an upturned ice cream cone on his head, sign of divine approval according to Hon but equally a potentially parodic view of all war, justified or not.