parrhesia


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parrhesia

(pəˈriːʒə; pəˈriːsɪə)
n
(Rhetoric) rhetoric boldness or frankness of speech; the act of asking forgiveness for speaking in such a way

parrhesia

a tendency to boldness and frankness of speech; freedom of expression, as in much modern literature.
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A critical function of this irregular hermeneutic can be found in a theological discourse of parrhesia (speaking openly, frankly or boldly, Mark 8:32).
Socratic dialogue is based on the spirit of parrhesia or "direct speech" which is a key feature of Western philosophy (Capurro 2006a).
In the revisions made to Thersites' speeches between his 1598 and 1611 editions of his Iliad, Chapman betrays a conflicted attitude towards Homer's most notorious railer, whose very name (from the Greek thersos, or thersos, meaning boldness or boastfulness) reveals his kinship with the parrhesia of the iambic blame-poet (Thalmann 1998, 83; Nagy 1979, 261; 309).
In what respect, for instance, might public figures, including statesmen benefit from the classical mode of parrhesia (which she attributes, understandably enough, to Erasmus)?
possuiam duas palavras: parrhesia, termo disseminado
The word parrhesia here denotes less the ability than the permission to speak.
Parrhesia also refers to a kind of moral bravery as well as duty.
His route into the subject is via an analysis of the rhetorical figure of free speech, parrhesia (licentia in Latin).
Fearless Speech is all about the ancient Greek concept of parrhesia --'speaking fearlessly'.
The proof of this assertion requires additional research on the transportability of poetic parrhesia from Hades to the domain of the living.
Esta dimension de interioridad y ensimismamiento de la amistad la ligamos con la parrhesia de los griegos.