parrhesia


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parrhesia

(pəˈriːʒə; pəˈriːsɪə)
n
(Rhetoric) rhetoric boldness or frankness of speech; the act of asking forgiveness for speaking in such a way

parrhesia

a tendency to boldness and frankness of speech; freedom of expression, as in much modern literature.
See also: Language Style
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References in periodicals archive ?
The richer the heritage which you are called to share with parrhesia, the more eloquent should be the humility with which you should offer it.
On absolute life in post-Kantian idealism, see Eugene Thacker, "Darklife: Negation, Nothingness, and the Will-to-Life in Schopenhauer," Parrhesia 12 (2011): 12-27.
As Michel Foucault describes it, parrhesia is a form of free speech, a speech act of a sort, that is marked by frankness and truth and accompanied by a sense of both duty and risk (11-19).
Foucault's own self-image as a philosopher who 'thinks differently' and practices parrhesia (fearless speech; Foucault 2001).
Parada embraces Foucault's concept parrhesia, "the act of telling all through plain speaking, and speaking openly" (p.
The articles within this special issue, written by black men and black women philosophers/scholars, demonstrate the importance of black philosophy as a site of parrhesia that has universal implications for both philosophy and extra-philosophical concerns, concerns that burn at the level of the quotidian, the everyday existential complexities of life.
But, significantly, Catlaw drops Foucault's recommended political strategy of verbal confrontation: parrhesia.
Within the classic Greek practice of parrhesia (to speak the truth in public) whereby the Socratic interlocutor is incited to self-reflexivity, becoming accountable of oneself requires to "yield to another's words, another's demand:" to speak of oneself is thus not only an act one performs according to the paradigms of a certain logos, but it is also a social exchange that more than leading to a complete or truthful narrative, becomes an occasion of linguistic and social self-transformation (Butler, Giving an Account of Oneself 125-30).
In the Gospels the word parrhesia appears in more than thirty places, (15) and each time it is about Jesus' open and merciless attitude toward hypocritical individuals and his invitation to his listeners to the same engagement.
See Peter Caravetta, "Form, Person and Inexhaustible Interpretation: Luigi Pareyson, Existence, Interpretation, Freedom," Parrhesia 12 (2010): 101.
Having as its devices irony and parrhesia, it aims at a psychological destabilization of the interlocutor through the emotion of shame.
people that enjoy parrhesia as a birthright often end up having