Elgin Marbles

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Elgin marbles

pl n
(Antiques) a group of 5th-century bc Greek sculptures originally decorating the Parthenon in Athens, brought to England by Thomas Bruce, seventh Earl of Elgin (1766–1841), and now at the British Museum
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Noun1.Elgin Marbles - a collection of classical Greek marble sculptures and fragments of architecture created by PhidiasElgin Marbles - a collection of classical Greek marble sculptures and fragments of architecture created by Phidias; chiefly from the Parthenon in Athens
statuary - statues collectively
Translations

Elgin Marbles

[ˈelgɪnˈmɑːbls] NPL the Elgin Marbleslos mármoles del Partenón
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References in periodicals archive ?
Lambis initially wrote the play for a full cast after visiting the new Acropolis Museum in Athens in 2014, where he saw replicas of the Parthenon marbles and a huge poster on the subway of Melina Mercouri.
Getty Museum, just as the Parthenon marbles are in the Duveen Gallery at
After leaving politics, he devoted himself to one of his lifelong passions and became chair of the British Committee for the Restitution of the Parthenon Marbles.
The British expropriation of other peoples' patrimony, from the Parthenon Marbles to the Kohinoor diamond, is a particular point of contention, as conceding any one item could, the British fear, open a Pandora's box of problems.
She draws on and updates the research of Francis Haskell, Nicholas Penny and Ian Jenkins, among others, and contributes new scholarship comprising an account of Sir Richard Worsley's travels, collections and publications, including his ambitions to be the first to publish the engravings of the Parthenon Marbles.
A UK-based group called The British Committee for the Reunification of the Parthenon Marbles endorses Athens' demand.
Greece has been campaigning vociferously for the return of the magnificent Parthenon Marbles held by the British Museum.
Another refusal to detach: the entire upper floor of the New Acropolis Museum dramatizes the missing Parthenon marbles by filling in their absence with white plaster moldings.
However, Mr Jenkins points out correctly that the Ottoman Empire no longer exists; this is important as it is solely on the strength of Ottoman signatures that Britain claims legal ownership of the Parthenon Marbles and the Rosetta Stone.
The metopes, decorative architectural elements typically found above the architrave in Doric buildings, were based on scenes from the British Museum's famed Parthenon marbles, depicting the battle between the Centaurs and the Lapiths.
Christopher Price, deputy chairman of the British Committee for the Reunification of the Parthenon Marbles, said: "It will give us publicity, even if it won't shift the law.
It is axiomatic that the Sphinx Beard and Rosetta Stone belong in Egypt; that the Parthenon Marbles belong in Greece, and on, and on.