caucus

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cau·cus

 (kô′kəs)
n. pl. cau·cus·es or cau·cus·ses
1.
a. A meeting of the local members of a political party especially to select delegates to a convention or register preferences for candidates running for office.
b. A closed meeting of party members within a legislative body to decide on questions of policy or leadership.
c. A group within a legislative or decision-making body seeking to represent a specific interest or influence a particular area of policy: a minority caucus.
2. Chiefly British A committee within a political party charged with determining policy.
v. cau·cused, cau·cus·ing, cau·cus·es or cau·cussed or cau·cus·sing or cau·cus·ses
v.intr.
To assemble in or hold a caucus.
v.tr.
To assemble or canvass (members of a caucus).

[After the Caucus Club of Boston, an influential Colonial political organization around the time of the American Revolution , perhaps from Medieval Latin caucus, drinking vessel, variant of Latin caucum; akin to Greek kaukos (both Greek and Latin being borrowed from the same unknown source).]

caucus

(ˈkɔːkəs)
n, pl -cuses
1. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) chiefly
a. a closed meeting of the members of one party in a legislative chamber, etc, to coordinate policy, choose candidates, etc
b. such a bloc of politicians: the Democratic caucus in Congress.
2. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) chiefly
a. a group of leading politicians of one party
b. a meeting of such a group
3. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) chiefly US a local meeting of party members
4. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) Brit a group or faction within a larger group, esp a political party, who discuss tactics, choose candidates, etc
5. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) Austral a group of MPs from one party who meet to discuss tactics, etc
6. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) NZ a formal meeting of all Members of Parliament belonging to one political party
vb
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) (intr) to hold a caucus
[C18: probably of Algonquian origin; related to caucauasu adviser]

cau•cus

(ˈkɔ kəs)

n., pl. -cus•es, n.
1.
a. a meeting of the members of a political party to select candidates or convention delegates, determine policy, etc.
b. a faction within a legislative body that pursues its interests through the legislative process: the black caucus.
2. any group or meeting organized to further a special interest or cause.
v.i.
3. to hold or meet in a caucus.
[1755–65, Amer.; appar. first used by the Caucus Club of colonial Boston]

Caucus

 an inner committee, usually political, that works behind the main party.

caucus


Past participle: caucused
Gerund: caucusing

Imperative
caucus
caucus
Present
I caucus
you caucus
he/she/it caucuses
we caucus
you caucus
they caucus
Preterite
I caucused
you caucused
he/she/it caucused
we caucused
you caucused
they caucused
Present Continuous
I am caucusing
you are caucusing
he/she/it is caucusing
we are caucusing
you are caucusing
they are caucusing
Present Perfect
I have caucused
you have caucused
he/she/it has caucused
we have caucused
you have caucused
they have caucused
Past Continuous
I was caucusing
you were caucusing
he/she/it was caucusing
we were caucusing
you were caucusing
they were caucusing
Past Perfect
I had caucused
you had caucused
he/she/it had caucused
we had caucused
you had caucused
they had caucused
Future
I will caucus
you will caucus
he/she/it will caucus
we will caucus
you will caucus
they will caucus
Future Perfect
I will have caucused
you will have caucused
he/she/it will have caucused
we will have caucused
you will have caucused
they will have caucused
Future Continuous
I will be caucusing
you will be caucusing
he/she/it will be caucusing
we will be caucusing
you will be caucusing
they will be caucusing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been caucusing
you have been caucusing
he/she/it has been caucusing
we have been caucusing
you have been caucusing
they have been caucusing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been caucusing
you will have been caucusing
he/she/it will have been caucusing
we will have been caucusing
you will have been caucusing
they will have been caucusing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been caucusing
you had been caucusing
he/she/it had been caucusing
we had been caucusing
you had been caucusing
they had been caucusing
Conditional
I would caucus
you would caucus
he/she/it would caucus
we would caucus
you would caucus
they would caucus
Past Conditional
I would have caucused
you would have caucused
he/she/it would have caucused
we would have caucused
you would have caucused
they would have caucused

caucus

A meeting of members of a political party to choose candidates or delegates or decide on matters of policy.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.caucus - a closed political meetingcaucus - a closed political meeting    
group meeting, meeting - a formally arranged gathering; "next year the meeting will be in Chicago"; "the meeting elected a chairperson"
Verb1.caucus - meet to select a candidate or promote a policy
foregather, forgather, gather, assemble, meet - collect in one place; "We assembled in the church basement"; "Let's gather in the dining room"

caucus

noun group, division, section, camp, sector, lobby, bloc, contingent, pressure group, junta the Black Caucus of minority congressmen
Translations

caucus

[ˈkɔːkəs]
A. N (caucuses (pl)) (Brit) → camarilla f (política), junta f secreta (US) (= meeting) → junta f ejecutiva; (= committee) → comité m ejecutivo, comisión f ejecutiva
B. VIreunirse (para tomar decisiones)

caucus

n (= committee)Gremium nt, → Ausschuss m; (US: = meeting) → Sitzung f

caucus

[ˈkɔːkəs] n (Am) (Pol) → (riunione f del) comitato elettorale (Brit) (Pol) (group) → comitato di dirigenti
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