patriarchy

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pa·tri·ar·chy

 (pā′trē-är′kē)
n. pl. pa·tri·ar·chies
1.
a. A social system in which the father is the head of the family.
b. A family, community, or society based on this system or governed by men.
2.
a. Dominance of a society by men, or the values that uphold such dominance.
b. The collection of men in positions of power, exerting such dominance. In all senses also called patriarchate.

patriarchy

(ˈpeɪtrɪˌɑːkɪ)
n, pl -chies
1. (Sociology) a form of social organization in which a male is the head of the family and descent, kinship, and title are traced through the male line
2. (Sociology) any society governed by such a system

pa•tri•ar•chy

(ˈpeɪ triˌɑr ki)

n., pl. -chies.
1.
a. a form of social organization in which the father is the head of the family, clan, or tribe and descent is reckoned in the male line.
b. a society based on this social organization.
2.
a. an institution or organization in which power is held by and transferred through males.
b. the principles or philosophy upon which control by male authority is based.
[1555–65; < Greek]

patriarchy

1. a community in which the father or oldest male is the supreme authority, and descent is traced through the male line.
2. government by males, with one as supreme. — patriarchist, n. — patri-archic, patriarchical, adj.
See also: Male
1. a community in which the father or oldest male is the supreme authority in the family, clan, or tribe, and descent is traced through the male line.
2. government by males, with one as supreme. — patriarchist, n. — patri-archic, patriarchical, adj.
See also: Father
a society organized to give supremacy to the father or the oldest male in governing a family, tribe, or clan. — patriarch, n.
See also: Government
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.patriarchy - a form of social organization in which a male is the family head and title is traced through the male line
social organisation, social organization, social structure, social system, structure - the people in a society considered as a system organized by a characteristic pattern of relationships; "the social organization of England and America is very different"; "sociologists have studied the changing structure of the family"
Translations

patriarchy

[ˈpeɪtrɪˌɑːkɪ] Npatriarcado m

patriarchy

nPatriarchat nt
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