patriline


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Related to patriline: patrilineage, Patrilineal descent

pat·ri·line

 (păt′rə-līn′)
n.
A line of descent traced through the paternal side of a family.
References in periodicals archive ?
Second, it finds that the attempt by Stephens to identify the Tara-Waragal with a possible Woiwurrung patriline identified in a series of sketches by William Thomas found in the RB Smyth Papers was also a failure.
This grouping, also called kingal tama ('one father'), could refer to the descendants of the same patriline (Yu 1980 : 97).
Further, research suggests that maintaining "face" involves fulfilling certain gender role expectations such as marrying and bearing children to extend the patriline (Lee, 1986; Moua, 2003).
Using this method of enquiry, I collected a case that gives an example of how the wealthier patriline members are transforming into small marginal farmers generation after generation within the marginal environment.
First, citizenship is restricted to the patriline, meaning that children are born to the father's nationality, and Jordanian women are not entitled to pass on their citizenship.
DeGrandi-Hoffman also found that when colonies are replacing their queens, African patriline queens (queens that had an African sire) emerge sooner than EHB rivals, giving them a big advantage in the fight to become the nest's new queen.
The importance of a single location for the commemoration of one patriline of the family is indicated by an archival notice dated 22 December 1402 concerning Salvestro's brother Andrea.
The term khashm al-bayt is an idiom, too, for the patriline arising in the house and hosh.
In the late 19th century Pavel Viskovatov came up with the idea of family graves, with every new generation of the patriline attaching a new tarand to the previous one(s), thus creating burial grounds of tarand-grave chains (Tvauri 2003).
Thus, Gimcrack's will acts out the virtuoso's failure to properly comply with the rules that govern the social structures of family, patriline, and reproduction of economic classes, while it lays bare the structure of commodity fetishism.
But if blood sacrifice in some mysterious way substantiates the otherwise merely notional patriline, displaying its reality in the opened body of the victim, then filial sacrifice goes to the heart of this mystery, forcing its paradox to the breaking point by offering up, in the firstborn son, the very body that creates fatherhood in the full patriarchal and patrilineal sense" (5).
If the father did not have a sister, an older woman in the victim's patriline was asked to prepare the body.