Pauling Linus Carl

Pau·ling

 (pô′lĭng), Linus Carl 1901-1994.
American chemist. He won a 1954 Nobel Prize for work on the nature of chemical bonding and the 1962 Nobel Peace Prize for his efforts toward disarmament.

Pau·ling

(pô′lĭng), Linus Carl 1901-1994.
American chemist noted for his work on the structure and nature of chemical bonding. After studying in Europe with Niels Bohr and other physicists, Pauling applied quantum physics to chemistry. He discovered the structure of many molecules found in living tissue, especially proteins and amino acids. While studying the structure of hemoglobin, Pauling discovered the genetic defect that causes sickle cell anemia.
Biography Linus Pauling is as well known for his efforts to make the world a better place as for advancing the frontiers of scientific knowledge. After devoting two decades to investigating chemical bonding, he made one of his most important discoveries one day while he was sick in bed. He lay there playing with pieces of paper, imagining them as molecules, and in a few hours he had figured out how amino acids are arranged in proteins. For this and related work he won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1954. Pauling also worked tirelessly on behalf of world peace. He studied the harmful effects of nuclear fallout from atomic weapons and concluded that they should be banned, a position that got him into trouble. He was accused of being a Communist and was prevented from traveling abroad for a while, almost missing the award ceremony for his Nobel Prize. Pauling did not give in, however. He helped get a petition signed by thousands of scientists calling for an end to nuclear testing. In 1962 he won the Nobel Peace Prize for his efforts. He is the only person ever to receive two unshared Nobel Prizes. Pauling devoted much of his later life to researching the health benefits of large doses of vitamins and minerals, especially vitamin C.
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