Paulinism


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Paulinism

the teachings of the apostle Paul, who believed that people should be emancipated from Jewish law and allowed to follow the faith and spirit of Christ. — Paulist, n. — Paulinian, adj.
See also: Christianity
Translations
paulinisme
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References in periodicals archive ?
Their topics include the Bible and the crocodile: an exercise in balancing translation technique and text-critical data, quotations from the lost books in the Hebrew Bible: a new translation and introduction, scripture and God's authority: case studies and further questions, the reception of Paul's understanding of resurrection and eschatology in the Epistle to Rheginos: faithful Paulinism or further development, between ritual and moral purity: early Christian views of dietary laws, and Augustine's Enarrationes and the final form of the Psalter.
In 1951, Martin Buber contributed an essay to an anthology entitled Two Types of Faith called "A New Type of Faith" in which he asserts the appearance of Paulinism without Christ.
Instead, while Calvin's early Paulinism endured, it also evolved through the long course of his career as an expositor, absorbing lessons, perspectives, and challenges offered by the successive varieties of non-Pauline material he encountered.
Lutherans have learned so sharply to distinguish their version of the doctrine of justification from Augustine's that they often imagine themselves to have leaped over the centuries and retrieved a pure world of Paulinism over against which Catholic-Orthodox differences pale into insignificance.
The thrust of the following pages is towards defining profiles of Paul and Paulinism in terms of the needs, questions, and values of the persons, groups, or movements represented in various texts.
The localization in Asia Minor, in circles which derived their theology from the early Jewish-Christian theology of the church of Antioch, is based on the relationship he argues between the letter of Jude and Paulinism, in particular the post-Pauline situation and theology he finds in Colossians.
Luke, it is argued, had been a companion of Paul, but one who expressed his deep commitment to Paulinism by reinterpreting and adapting Paul for a new age and situation; and Luke's work has an even closer link with the Gospel of Matthew, but this time an antagonistic one, in that the publication of Matthew's Gospel was catalyst for Luke's own publishing endeavours, which were concerned to provide, probably for the same community in which Matthew was written, a quite specific corrective to important aspects of the Matthean Gospel.
There is, then, a danger that the Paulinism of the fathers will simply become transparent, that it will be indistinguishable within their thought as a whole.
Odeberg's claim that the contrast between Rabbinism and Paulinism culminated in the question of the freedom of the will.
In chapter four Grant gives a sympathetic picture of the activity of the Valentinian Ptolemaeus and his special blend of allegory and detailed literalism, although his claim that the latter was upholding Jewish-Christian teaching against the radical Paulinism of Marcion needs to be spelt out more: the Valentinians could allow some positive value to the Jewish law because its source, the psychic Demiurge, was an unconscious instrument of the divine.