Pawnee


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Paw·nee

 (po-nē′)
n. pl. Pawnee or Paw·nees
1. A member of a Native American people formerly inhabiting the Platte River valley in south-central Nebraska and northern Kansas, with a present-day population in north-central Oklahoma. The Pawnee comprised a confederation of four relatively independent tribes living in permanent villages.
2. The Caddoan language of the Pawnee.

[North American French Pani, of Illinois origin, ultimately of Siouan origin.]

Pawnee

(pɔːˈniː)
npl -nees or -nee
1. (Peoples) a member of a confederacy of related North American Indian peoples, formerly living in Nebraska and Kansas, now chiefly in Oklahoma
2. (Languages) the language of these peoples, belonging to the Caddoan family

Paw•nee

(pɔˈni)

n., pl. -nees, (esp. collectively) -nee.
1. a member of an American Indian people living along the Platte River and its tributaries in Nebraska during the first half of the 19th century: confined to a reservation in the Indian Territory in 1874–75.
2. the Caddoan language of the Pawnees, closely related to Arikara.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Pawnee - a member of the Pawnee nation formerly living in Nebraska and Kansas but now largely in Oklahoma
Caddo - a group of Plains Indians formerly living in what is now North and South Dakota and Nebraska and Kansas and Arkansas and Louisiana and Oklahoma and Texas
2.Pawnee - the Caddoan language spoken by the Pawnee
Caddoan, Caddoan language, Caddo - a family of North American Indian languages spoken widely in the Midwest by the Caddo
References in classic literature ?
Lay a row of moccasins before me - Pawnee, Sioux, Shoshone, Cheyenne, Blackfoot, and as many other tribes as you please - and I can name the tribe every moccasin belongs to by the make of it.
The Pawnee republicans had inflicted a gross indignity on a favorite and distinguished Omaha brave.
"It may be well enough, to try the rifle," muttered a dull looking man, whose features, both in outline and expression, bore no small resemblance to the first speaker, and who loosened the stock of his piece and brought it dexterously to the front, while delivering this opinion; "the Pawnee Loups are said to be hunting by hundreds in the plains; if so, they'll never miss a single man from their tribe.